male student studying in a college libraryIn past posts, I’ve said how I’d change grade school, PE class, medical school, and school in general. Today I’ll tell you how I’d change higher education—colleges and universities. This was the hardest one yet to write because the “purpose” of college is so open-ended and vast.

What is the purpose of the university? Is it to train people get good jobs? Establish careers? Is its purpose to help students figure out who they are and what they believe—to “find themselves”? Is it a grand filter, a way for society to establish and separate the “elite” from the rest? Or is college the grand equalizer, a way for anyone and everyone to obtain a quality education and find their way up in the world?

It can’t be all of those things, and yet it tries to make it work.

It’s where elites go to get eliter.

It’s where kids from poor backgrounds can go to make it and stand out, where your background doesn’t matter anymore—only your ability.

It’s where you experiment with substances and subcultures and belief systems.

It’s where you buckle down and work hard to get ahead.

It’s where you go to party and make friends for life.

Are these disparate goals and identities sustainable?

This is why it’s so hard to make blanket recommendations about college. College is many things at once. If I were to change higher education, though, a safe starting bet would be to make personal responsibility the highest guiding principle. Not blame. Not guilt. Yeah, responsibility would undergird everything the school did—professors, administrators, and students alike.

 

Responsibility Over Blame and Guilt

Blame foists the problems onto “those people.” It removes you from the equation, changing you into a child who can’t do anything but whine and point fingers. Even if “blame” is accurate, it doesn’t get you anywhere. Blaming others absolves you of the responsibility and most importantly ability to change the trajectory of your life (or the world). It allows you to flail and complain and that’s about it.

Guilt feels like it’s enough. Guilt feels like you’re doing something, but you’re really just feeling sorry for yourself. Nothing moves forward. If anything, because you feel worse about yourself, you’re less likely to make any positive changes or take any steps forward. Also, guilt is often blame in disguise.

Responsibility is the answer to almost all ills.

The beauty of this is that it takes care of itself. If you just stop blaming others or indulging your sense of guilt, you naturally shift toward taking responsibility for your thoughts, actions, and future. If wallowing in unproductive guilt and blame aren’t options, assuming the responsibility and taking the reins are all that’s left over.

Eliminate unnecessary general ed requirements.

As I remember it, everyone, no matter the major, had to take basic classes in literature, math, biology, and other sciences and humanities. It sounds good, right? We all want well-rounded individuals entering society with a broad overall knowledge base. Right?

Well, that’s not how it goes. Kids end up taking classes they don’t really care about, often going over things they already took in high school. Either that or the introductory classes are also “weeder” classes that make the material so onerous and boring to filter out the people who are majoring in the subject and don’t really have what it takes. It filters out people who aren’t serious about really being an English major, but it also makes students who are just taking it to fulfill a Gen Ed requirement lifelong haters of reading (or biology, or art, etc).

Incorporate physical culture into the college experience.

Instead of loading up on general ed requirements, require that students take at least one physical training class every quarter or semester.

  • Teach boxing or jiu jitsu.
  • Have a wide range of Olympic lifting, strength training, sprinting classes.
  • Bouldering and rock climbing and rappeling and parkour.
  • Dance of all sorts.

Imagine if, instead of just packing on the freshman 15 and binge drinking every weekend, college students were also engaged in the pursuit of physical culture. Movement sessions before tests. Walking lectures. You can’t really stop the partying, but at least you can try to balance it out with some healthy physical activity.

The ability to move one’s body, to strengthen it, to extend its utility and improve its aesthetics is the most general human requirement of all. Higher education should not neglect it.

Outdoor classes.

I will never stop banging this drum. Move it all outside. Move entire classes outdoors. If COVID persists, moving classes outdoors would mitigate (and probably mostly eliminate) spread and enhance innate immunity. Furthermore, studying and working outdoors has been shown to improve attentional capacity in people, allowing them to focus on the task at hand more easily.

More internships. Paid ones.

Medical school has a great “internship” system. You actually perform work as a doctor as part of your education. You do the thing you’re going through school to become. This is an obvious requirement when you’re training to save people’s lives and decide how to proceed on life or death matters, but I’d argue it belongs in all majors.

An internship would throw people straight into the fight to see who’s actually a good fit. Students who aren’t great students but excel actually doing the work in a realistic environment would rise to the top. Students who aren’t actually suited for the work would be identified and given the chance to switch paths before getting in too deep.

Make it more like technical or trade schools.

In a technical school, you get in to learn the skill or set of skills and get out. You’re there to learn a skill and prepare for a career. You’ll often have a job guarantee upon graduation. Employers have close relationships with the schools, both promoting and supporting the curriculum. This would work with other disciplines, too—not just car mechanics and computer technicians.

The “mystique” of the “college experience” is important, but not for everyone. Some people just want to learn a marketable skill and join the workforce.

Reduce costs.

I’m not going to go too deep into how we can reduce costs. There are entire books written on the subject, and I won’t try to squeeze it all in here. But the price of a college education has risen dramatically since I was applying and it’s either making college unaffordable for people who could thrive there or forcing people into assuming massive debt just to get a degree. Here are some ideas:

Make colleges accountable for some portion of student debt. If a graduate is 200k in the hole with no sign of being able to pay it back, the education they received probably wasn’t very good. A college should shoulder some of the load. This sounds “unfair” and would be at first but would incentivize better lending. This could go hand-in-hand with job guarantees—student doesn’t get a job within the allotted time frame, the school starts picking up some of the loan.

Eliminate unnecessary bureaucracy. An enormous portion of a college’s education budget goes toward paying administrators who have little to nothing to do with actually providing education. I’d love to see colleges become more spartan institutions, focusing on teaching and research rather than accruing an ever-growing population of administrators.

Alter government-backed loans. A government loan is a free license for colleges to continually raise tuition costs because the most powerful entity in the nation will always be there to pay for it. I would suggest implementing accountability measures on the shoulders of academic institutions who accept government-backed monies, and placing limits on tuition increases in a given timeframe. As it is, it remains largely unchecked.

Make it easier to start a university. Provide more supply and the price drops. A bonus is that it will also introduce more interesting, innovative institutions. I’m not talking about scam universities that take your money without providing a sufficient education. I’m referring to legitimate, accredited institutions. More of those.

Break it up?

Maybe colleges should be broken up into smaller schools that specialize in specific disciplines. Every major becomes its own technical school, perhaps loosely affiliated with other schools so that a student could take an elective in a different discipline if he or she so desired. I don’t know if that would eliminate the institutional bloat and inertia or just rearrange it under a different name, but I think it would be a step in the right direction.

As always, the devil is in the details. These are big picture items that would need to be fleshed out in a forum beyond the capacity of a blog post.

But one thing occurs to me as I read over this post: Maybe we should just blow the whole thing up and start all over. The university is ultimately a medieval institution—not in a bad sense, but in a different sense. It was created for a world that no longer exists, a world where knowledge was secret and bound up in physical tomes. If you wanted access to that knowledge, you had to enroll and be accepted. Today, knowledge is cheap, widely available from the comfort of your own pocket, yet the existence of the modern university still assumes the presence of secret knowledge only obtained through direct physical access to exclusive halls of learning.

Is college still relevant? I don’t know anymore. Can it be preserved? Probably, but it’ll have to change.

What do you think, folks? What would you change about higher education?

Primal Kitchen Buffalo


The post How I’d Change Higher Education appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Dr. Steven Bratman coined the term orthorexia (“right appetite”) more than two decades ago to describe what happens when health-conscious diets go too far.

Although it still hasn’t been accepted as an official medical diagnosis, orthorexia nervosa is a proposed eating disorder that involves an extreme obsession with eating a “correct” diet. People with orthorexia nervosa strive to eat only foods they consider healthy and strictly avoid foods they deem to be unhealthy or impure. Their obsession with eating a healthy diet takes over their lives, eventually impairing their mental, social, and even physical well-being.

The topic of orthorexia is controversial within health circles. On the surface, it can be hard to distinguish between folks who are simply health-conscious and those who have crossed the line into disordered eating. Any diet—even relatively mainstream ones like Mediterranean or paleo—could veer into orthorexia depending on the individual.

People who raise concerns about orthorexia often get accused of “fit-shaming.” Then the straw man arguments begin: “Oh, so I guess it’s healthier just to eat Twinkies and Big Macs, then?” No, obviously not. Orthorexia starts with food rules or following diets, but it’s much more than that.

To be clear: Wanting to be healthy is not orthorexic. Neither is believing that some foods are healthier or more nutritious than others. Cutting out certain foods, tracking macronutrients, or following a specific diet is not inherently problematic.

However, those behaviors can be stepping stones to orthorexia, so this is a conversation we need to be willing to have.

What is Orthorexia Nervosa?

Orthorexia nervosa is a preoccupation with healthy eating that ultimately interferes with health and well-being.

The first stage involves setting rules and restrictions around what foods you will and will not eat. Specific rules vary from person to person. An individual might avoid gluten, food additives, GMOs, dairy, animal products, nightshades, sugar, artificial sweeteners, grains, or whatever they deem to be unhealthy.

Before you get defensive, understand that food rules are only step one. They are necessary but not sufficient for developing orthorexia nervosa. Many people follow set diets or restrict certain food groups without developing orthorexia. Diet behaviors don’t cross the line into orthorexia nervosa until they start to interfere with quality of life.

Definition of Orthorexia Nervosa

Eating disorders and other mental health disorders each have a set of diagnostic criteria. These are like checklists that help doctors and therapists decide when a particular diagnosis is warranted. Currently, orthorexia nervosa is not recognized as an eating disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). That means there are no agreed-upon diagnostic criteria.

Nevertheless, researchers and practitioners need to be able to differentiate an ardent healthy-eating enthusiast from someone who has crossed the line into disordered eating. Experts have proposed various ways of defining orthorexia nervosa.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340368/‘>2 Perfectionism and narcissism may also contribute to orthorexic tendencies.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27756637/‘>4 More research is needed in each of these areas.

It’s not clear whether orthorexia nervosa is related to gender, age, or BMI.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26724459/‘>6 We’d expect these folks to prioritize healthy eating, but that doesn’t necessarily mean their beliefs or behaviors are problematic.

Healthy Orthorexia Versus Orthorexia Nervosa

Although the concept of orthorexia is more than two decades old at this point, researchers and clinicians are still trying to draw a clear line between healthy and unhealthy concerns about food. In 2018, researchers from two Spanish universities proposed a new tool called the Teruel Orthorexia Scale to separately measure “healthy orthorexia” and orthorexia nervosa.https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0219609‘>8 Because this is a new measure, we’ll have to wait for more studies to provide insight into this vital distinction.

Conclusion

At its core, orthorexia is “clean eating” taken too far.

Hopefully it’s clear that orthorexia is about much more than simply being health-conscious. As Dr. Bratman explains:

“Adopting a theory of healthy eating is NOT orthorexia. A theory may be conventional or unconventional, extreme or lax, sensible or totally wacky, but, regardless of the details, followers of the theory do not necessarily have orthorexia. …Enthusiasm for healthy eating doesn’t become ‘orthorexia’ until a tipping point is reached and enthusiasm transforms into obsession [sic].”

You can believe that diet profoundly impacts health, avoid specific foods, weigh and track all your food, and still go about your merry way without developing orthorexia nervosa.

But, if you feel your diet taking over your life, or if the thought of eating something off-plan makes you break into a cold sweat, it’s a good idea to seek help. Even though it’s not an officially recognized mental health disorder, many eating disorder specialists focus on treating individuals with orthorexia nervosa. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) hotline is a good place to start.

Orthorexia Nervosa FAQs

Is orthorexia an obsession with healthy eating?

“Orthorexia” means wanting to eat “correctly.” The term may be used to describe disordered eating, as in orthorexia nervosa. That is an obsession or preoccupation with eating only specific foods that you consider healthy and avoiding foods you think are unhealthy.

What are the main warning signs or symptoms of orthorexia nervosa?

The defining characteristics are: (1) having strict food rules about what you will and will not eat based on your definition of “healthy,” and (2) those rules negatively impact your psychological, social, and/or physical well-being. Truly healthy diets should enhance, not detract from, your quality of life.

How common is orthorexia nervosa?

No one really knows because of problems with how orthorexia nervosa has been measured in the past. Estimates range from as few as 3 percent of people in the general population to more than 80 percent in health-focused communities, but those numbers may not be reliable.https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_olink/r/1501/10?clear=10&p10_accession_num=kent1585488932218267‘>10

Is fasting or eating only one meal a day the same as orthorexia?

Orthorexia nervosa has to do with beliefs about food quality and eating only “healthy” foods. People may also use fasting to try to achieve health, but that isn’t the same as orthorexia. The same goes for excessive exercise. Both can co-occur with orthorexia, but they aren’t themselves orthorexic.

Is my ______ diet orthorexic?

No diet is inherently orthorexic, no matter how restrictive it is. Context always matters. You can’t decide if someone’s diet is orthorexic without knowing why they are following it and how it is impacting their emotional health, physical health, social relationships, occupation, and overall quality of life.

Primal Kitchen Buffalo


The post Orthorexia: Where to Draw the Line Between Healthy Eating and Obsession? appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Sometimes, trending recipes aren’t what you were expecting. Other times, they’re a hit with your whole family. This is one of those times. This TikTok tortilla hack turns a plain old tortilla into a hearty meal or treat in just a few minutes, and the possibilities for fillings are endless. We’re offering up a few recipes to get you started, but soon you’ll find yourself adding a little of this or that to put your own creative spin on the popular folded tortilla wrap.

Have the Kids Make Their Own Folded Tortilla

Kids are more likely to eat foods that they prepared themselves. Give them a sense of control by letting them choose what goes in each quadrant. Folding tortillas this way solves a challenging part of eating wraps when your hands are little – it turns the tortilla into a cup that holds all the goodies inside!

Other Ideas for Tortilla Fillings

Savory

  • Sauteed peppers and onions
  • Sliced sausage
  • Sauteed kale
  • Feta or goat cheese
  • Buffalo sauce
  • Ranch dressing
  • Pesto mayo

Sweet

  • Blackberries
  • Strawberries
  • Homemade nutella
  • Homemade marshmallows

Here’s how to make a bacon avocado breakfast folded tortilla, and a chocolate strawberry bacon breakfast tortilla.

Avocado Bacon Breakfast Tortilla Wrap

Ingredients

Almond flour tortilla (Siete or Whole Foods brand)
1 fried egg
2 slices cooked bacon, broken into a few pieces
1/4 sliced avocado
1/2 oz. cheese of choice
Primal Kitchen® Avocado Oil Spray or Avocado Oil
Salsa for dipping

Directions

Preheat a seasoned cast iron skillet on the stovetop over medium heat. Once hot, add a little avocado oil or use avocado oil spray. Place the tortilla in the pan and let it heat up for 15 seconds on each side. You want the tortilla to be pliable and soft, but not to the point where it gets too toasted and gets tough.

Quickly cut a slit halfway through the center of the tortilla. Orient the tortilla so the cut side of the tortilla is facing you.

Arrange the fillings in each quadrant of the tortilla.

Fold the bottom left flap of the tortilla up to meet the top left. Flip that section to the right to cover the top right quadrant. Then flip one more time to cover the bottom right quadrant.

Add a little more avocado spray to the pan. Once the oil is hot, place the folded tortilla in it. If needed, you can gently press the tortilla down with a small skillet or bottom of a heavy jar.

Flip the folded tortilla over with a spatula until both sides are nice and browned.

Repeat with additional tortillas and fillings.

Eat your tortillas as is, or dip the savory breakfast tortillas in salsa!

 

Print

Tortilla Hack: Avocado Bacon Breakfast folded Tortilla



  • Author:
    Mark’s Daily Apple

  • Prep Time:
    5

  • Cook Time:
    2

  • Total Time:
    7

  • Yield:
    1 serving

  • Diet:
    Gluten Free

Description

That tortilla hack you saw on TikTok? We made it Primal using an almond flour tortilla. Here’s a savory avocado bacon breakfast tortilla wrap that takes just minutes to make.

 


Ingredients

Almond flour tortilla (Siete or Whole Foods brand)
1 fried egg
2 slices cooked bacon, broken into a few pieces
1/4 sliced avocado
1/2 oz. cheese of choice
Primal Kitchen® Avocado Oil Spray or Avocado Oil
Salsa for dipping


Instructions

Preheat a seasoned cast iron skillet on the stovetop over medium heat. Once hot, add a little avocado oil or use avocado oil spray. Place the tortilla in the pan and let it heat up for 15 seconds on each side. You want the tortilla to be pliable and soft, but not to the point where it gets too toasted and gets tough.

Quickly cut a slit halfway through the center of the tortilla. Orient the tortilla so the cut side of the tortilla is facing you.

Arrange the fillings in each quadrant of the tortilla.

Fold the bottom left flap of the tortilla up to meet the top left. Flip that section to the right to cover the top right quadrant. Then flip one more time to cover the bottom right quadrant.

Add a little more avocado spray to the pan. Once the oil is hot, place the folded tortilla in it. If needed, you can gently press the tortilla down with a small skillet or bottom of a heavy jar.

Flip the folded tortilla over with a spatula until both sides are nice and browned.

Repeat with additional tortillas and fillings.

Eat your tortillas as is, or dip into your favorite salsa!

Notes

If your eggs are large, you might need to cut the fried egg in half before placing on the tortilla. You could also try using small or medium eggs instead. I simply fried them in a cast iron pan until the yolks were soft, but feel free to prepare them however you like!

The tortillas I used were Whole Foods Brand grain-free almond flour tortillas – Siete brand tortillas work too. They are about 7 inches wide. If you use a larger tortilla, you may want to add more of each filling.

In lieu of heating the tortilla in a skillet, you can also wrap it in a damp paper towel and place in the microwave for 20-30 seconds, but I found the skillet to be easier and faster.

After some testing, the arrangement of the fillings in each of their quadrants in the images seems to be the best way to get the tortilla to stick together, but of course feel free to put the ingredients wherever you’d like!

  • Category: Breakfast
  • Method: Stovetop

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 wrap
  • Calories: 423.9
  • Sugar: .7g
  • Sodium: 620.3mg
  • Fat: 34.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 10.4g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 5.3g
  • Trans Fat: .2g
  • Carbohydrates: 9.1 g
  • Fiber: 4.3 g
  • Protein: 16.9 g
  • Cholesterol: 229 mg

Keywords: tiktok tortilla, tortilla hack, tiktok tortilla wrap, breakfast tortilla, breakfast burrito, avocado egg and bacon breakfast burrito

Bacon Chocolate Strawberry Folded Tortilla Wrap

Ingredients

Almond flour tortilla (Siete or Whole Foods brand)
1-2 slices cooked bacon, broken into a few pieces
1-2 thinly sliced strawberries
1/2 tbsp. melted dark chocolate (we used 95%)
1/2 tbsp. nut butter of choice
Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Spray or Avocado Oil
Dark chocolate for dipping

Directions

Preheat a seasoned cast iron skillet on the stovetop over medium heat. Once hot, add a little avocado oil or use avocado oil spray. Place the tortilla in the pan and let it heat up for 15 seconds on each side. You want the tortilla to be pliable and soft, but not to the point where it gets too toasted and gets tough.

Quickly cut a slit halfway through the center of the tortilla. Orient the tortilla so the cut side of the tortilla is facing you.

Arrange the fillings in each quadrant of the tortilla.

Fold the bottom left flap of the tortilla up to meet the top left. Flip that section to the right to cover the top right quadrant. Then flip one more time to cover the bottom right quadrant.

Add a little more avocado spray to the pan. Once the oil is hot, place the folded tortilla in it. If needed, you can gently press the tortilla down with a small skillet or bottom of a heavy jar.

Flip the folded tortilla over with a spatula until both sides are nice and browned.

Repeat with additional tortillas and fillings.

Eat your tortillas as is, or dip the sweet tortillas in melted chocolate!

 

Print

Tortilla Hack: Chocolate Strawberry Bacon Wrap



  • Author:
    Mark’s Daily Apple

  • Prep Time:
    5 min

  • Cook Time:
    2 min

  • Total Time:
    7 min

  • Yield:
    1 wrap

  • Diet:
    Gluten Free

Description

Everyone’s favorite combination: salty and sweet. This chocolate strawberry bacon wrap uses an almond flour tortilla to keep it gluten-free and grain-free.

 

 


Ingredients

Almond flour tortilla (Siete or Whole Foods brand)
12 slices cooked bacon, broken into a few pieces
12 thinly sliced strawberries
1/2 tbsp. melted dark chocolate (we used 95%)
1/2 tbsp. nut butter of choice
Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Spray or Avocado Oil
Dark chocolate for dipping


Instructions

Preheat a seasoned cast iron skillet on the stovetop over medium heat. Once hot, add a little avocado oil or use avocado oil spray. Place the tortilla in the pan and let it heat up for 15 seconds on each side. You want the tortilla to be pliable and soft, but not to the point where it gets too toasted and gets tough.

Quickly cut a slit halfway through the center of the tortilla. Orient the tortilla so the cut side of the tortilla is facing you.

Arrange the fillings in each quadrant of the tortilla.

Fold the bottom left flap of the tortilla up to meet the top left. Flip that section to the right to cover the top right quadrant. Then flip one more time to cover the bottom right quadrant.

Add a little more avocado spray to the pan. Once the oil is hot, place the folded tortilla in it. If needed, you can gently press the tortilla down with a small skillet or bottom of a heavy jar.

Flip the folded tortilla over with a spatula until both sides are nice and browned.

Repeat with additional tortillas and fillings.

Eat your tortillas as is, or dip the sweet tortillas in melted chocolate!

  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Stovetop

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 wrap
  • Calories: 323.73
  • Sugar: 2.2 g
  • Sodium: 281 mg
  • Fat: 25.9 g
  • Saturated Fat: 8.8 g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 3.6 g
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 11.13 g
  • Fiber: 5.7 g
  • Protein: 8.76 g
  • Cholesterol: 15 mg

Tips

  • If your eggs are large, you might need to cut the fried egg in half before placing on the tortilla. You could also try using small or medium eggs instead. I simply fried them in a cast iron pan until the yolks were soft, but feel free to prepare them however you like!
  • The tortillas I used were Whole Foods Brand grain-free almond flour tortillas – Siete brand tortillas work too. They are about 7 inches wide. If you use a larger tortilla, you may want to add more of each filling.
  • In lieu of heating the tortilla in a skillet, you can also wrap it in a damp paper towel and place in the microwave for 20-30 seconds, but I found the skillet to be easier and faster.
  • After some testing, the arrangement of the fillings in each of their quadrants in the images seems to be the best way to get the tortilla to stick together, but of course feel free to put the ingredients wherever you’d like!

Primal-Kitchen-Buffalo-Sauce


The post That Tortilla Hack You Saw on TikTok (Savory and Sweet Options!) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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This is the ultimate cold weather soup. Inspired by my mother in law’s delicious turmeric chicken soup, this ginger turmeric chicken soup recipe makes frequent appearances in our rotation all winter long. It’s easy to make, and you’ll usually have most of the ingredients you need on hand – just pick up a couple turmeric roots on your next grocery trip that you can have ready for when the mood strikes.

As with traditional chicken soup recipes, you first make the broth with a whole chicken and aromatics. Then, the fun begins, and you can then add color, texture, and lots of flavor to your soup with grated veggies.

This is my go-to soup when I’m feeling stuffy or under the weather. There’s nothing like a steamy, rich broth with ginger to make me feel clear again.

Health Benefits of Flavorful Rhizomes Like Ginger and Turmeric

People have used ingredients like ginger and turmeric in teas, extracts, in culinary applications, and in capsules for a wide variety of purposes.

Ginger

A lot of people regularly incorporate ginger for its potential health benefits. 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ginger turmeric chicken soup

Ginger Turmeric Chicken Soup Recipe


Description

Chicken and vegetable soup flavored with vibrant ginger and bright, earthy turmeric. It’s the perfect, hearty soup for those cold-weather days.


Ingredients

For the chicken and broth:

3.54 lb. whole chicken

3 carrots

3 stalks celery

1/41/2 onion

3 knobs peeled turmeric

23 inch piece of peeled ginger

2 cloves garlic

handful of peppercorns

1 tsp. salt

1416 cups of water (may be more or less depending on your pot size)

For the soup:

5 tbsp. butter

1/2 cup grated onion

1.5 cups grated celery

2 cups grated carrots

3 cups grated zucchini

1.5 cups grated japanese sweet potato (or regular potato)

12 knobs of turmeric, peeled and grated

1/2 cup cilantro

salt

lemon juice


Instructions

Place your whole chicken in a large stock pot. Fill the pot with water until the chicken is fully submerged, which for our pot was about 14-16 cups. Cut the carrots and celery in 2-3 pieces.

Cut the turmeric, ginger and onion into chunks and smash the garlic. Add the carrots, celery, onion, turmeric, ginger, garlic, peppercorns and salt to the pot.

Heat over medium high heat to bring the liquid to a boil. Once the liquid comes to a boil, you can gently skim off any scum that floats to the surface.

When the liquid is maintaining a healthy simmer, cover the pot and allow the chicken to simmer for about an hour.

After this time, flip the chicken over and then recover the pot. Simmer for an additional 45-60 minutes, or until the chicken easily comes apart when you pull it out of the pot using tongs. Remove all of the chicken from the pot with tongs. Carefully strain the broth and remove the aromatics and veggies.

Allow the chicken to cool slightly and pick all of the chicken off of the bones.

Use a box grater to grate your veggies. In the empty pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Once melted and bubbly, add your grated onion, celery and carrots. Stir with a spoon and saute for 2-3 minutes, or until they’re soft. Add your zucchini and sweet potatoes and continue stirring until soft. Add your broth back to the pot and bring up to a simmer. Add the shredded chicken and grated turmeric. Season with salt to taste. Once the soup comes up to a boil, allow it to simmer for 5-10 minutes. Remove the soup from the heat and stir in the chopped cilantro. Ladle the soup into bowls and top with more cilantro and fresh lemon juice, if desired.

Notes

When grating the onions, celery, carrots, zucchini and potatoes, use the large holes on your box grater. When grating the turmeric, use a microplane or the tiny grating section on a box grater.

For a richer soup, don’t bother straining the chicken fat that accumulates on the top of the soup. You could also add more butter to the pot when sautéing your veggies. If you don’t like cilantro, you can use parsley or dill instead.

You can use a pressure cooker or Instant Pot instead of preparing the broth on the stovetop, but I found that the Instant Pot just isn’t large enough to fit the amount of broth, chicken and veggies I wanted to add to the pot and so prefer to use a large stock pot.

This is a BIG pot of soup so it will make plenty to feed a family and have leftovers to boot. It also freezes well for quick lunches later!

  • Category: Lunch, Dinner
  • Method: Stovetop, Instant Pot

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/8 of recipe
  • Calories: 522
  • Fat: 34g
  • Carbohydrates: 12g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 35g

Keywords: chicken soup, ginger soup, ginger, turmeric, soup

 

The post Ginger Turmeric Chicken Soup Recipe appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Research of the Week

Lower LDL, higher diabetes risk.

Vitamin D appears effective against Covid deaths.

Host selenium deficiency not only leaves you open to infections, it promotes the mutation of benign viruses into pathogenic ones.

Researchers were able to have conversations with dreamers during REM sleep.

“One hectare of a milpa comprising maize, common beans, and potatoes can provide the annual carbohydrate needs of more than 13 adults, enough protein for nearly 10 adults, and adequate supplies of many vitamins and minerals, according to the study.”

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

Episode 470: Diane Forster: Host Elle Russ chats with Diane Forster, a world-renowned expert on blasting through mindset blocks.

Episode 471: Dr Josh Axe: Brad Kearns welcomes Dr. Axe to talk about his new book, Ancient Remedies.

Health Coach Radio: Dr. Al Danenberg discusses managing cancer through immune health.

Media, Schmedia

Cows dying, milk dumped.

Interesting Blog Posts

A good reminder that’s always relevant.

Tyler Cowen’s lessons learned working in a supermarket.

Social Notes

This seems unwise.

Universal healthcare.

Everything Else

GMO Neanderthal brains that fit in your pocket.

What do jobless men do all day?

Things I’m Up to and Interested In

I am not surprised: Breast milk is good for babies (in this case, babies’ gut barrier function).

Interesting finding: The average person has between 2-4 passions.

Do you agree?: “Work on things that aren’t prestigious” as career advice.

Another take on vitamin D: From Scott Alexander.

Fascinating paper: Discussing the evolutionary and cultural changes resulting when humans had to start hunting and processing smaller game.

Question I’m Asking

Should “rich countries” switch entirely to lab-grown meat?

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Feb 12 – Feb 18)

Comment of the Week

“I do the same workout every day. A 4 mile hike in the woods. Then over the course of the day,. 3 sets of pushups, pull-ups, bodyweight squats and lunges. I sleep better this way. Two hard workouts per week always gave me insomnia.”

-Sounds ideal, Peter.

Primal-Kitchen-Buffalo-Sauce


The post Weekly Link Love — Edition 118 appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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woman at her laptop showing signs of burnoutWhere are my high achievers at? These are the folks that constantly knock their goals out of the park and make it look easy, whether they’re training for a marathon, dialing in their diet, or Marie Kondo-ing their house. They’re the ones who get the promotions, the bigger bank accounts, the smaller pant sizes…

We live in a culture that celebrates busy-ness. I’ve seen it manifest in my clients (they typically come to me in the post-crush-my-goals stage, once their nervous system is toast) but also in my personal life.https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evolution-the-self/200807/parent-pleasing-people-pleasing-part-1-3‘>2 You might have been rewarded for straight A’s or gotten kudos after a game-winning goal. Maybe you had a parent or caregiver that was never satisfied or emotionally distant (which you mistook as unsatisfied). Or perhaps you learned that by achieving more, you managed to secure the love, safety, and acceptance of your family or caregivers.

In these situations, your self-worth becomes tied to your performance, meaning you’re only “good enough” if and when you’ve accomplished something exceptional. And even then, your inner critic probably doubts that it’s enough.

The Need to Always Do Better

What we’re really talking about here is fear. Fear that you need to continue excelling, producing, winning, and succeeding in order to not be rejected or lose the approval of others.https://www.mind-body-health.net/hpa-axis.shtml‘>4 Keep in mind this isn’t true for everyone. But for a lot of us, especially those of us with perfectionist tendencies, it’s quite accurate.

 

Pros of being a high achiever:

  • You always bring your A-game
  • You’re driven to get results
  • You’re highly motivated
  • You’re passionate about what you do
  • You’re competitive
  • You thrive on positive feedback

Cons of being a high achiever:

  • You hold yourself to perfectionist standards
  • You’re afraid of failing
  • You believe you’re only as good as your last accomplishment
  • You tend to overcomplicate things
  • You don’t take time to appreciate your successes
  • You’re prone to burnout

Burnout: How Crushing It Leads to a Crash

Research continues to prove that burnout is real – and that it’s more significant among high achievers and perfectionists.https://www.who.int/news/item/28-05-2019-burn-out-an-occupational-phenomenon-international-classification-of-diseases:’>6

  • Feeling depleted or exhausted
  • Dissociation of negativity
  • Reduced efficacy

Not only that, evidence shows that burnout leads to dysregulation of the body’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis — if this is you, you’ve probably already noticed the signs.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25433974/‘>8 They looked at two groups of participants: one with a formal clinical diagnosis of burnout and one with symptoms but no formal diagnosis. Researchers analyzed saliva samples of all the participants and found that both groups had significantly lower morning cortisol levels compared with a group of healthy control subjects.

Why does this matter? Because low chronically cortisol levels can lead to cardiovascular disease, fatigue, muscle weakness, digestive issues, and the inability to “crush it” even if you wanted to.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22009156/‘>1 Selenoproteins require adequate selenium intake.

Selenium deficiencies can be very serious. Selenoproteins act as antioxidants. Without enough selenium—or really, selenoproteins—to offer protection, heart muscle cells can sustain free radical damage.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19856162/‘>3

However, your friend might want to know that aside from severe deficiencies, the jury is still out on the role of selenium in cardiovascular disease. Some, but not all, observational studies have found that low selenium is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590757‘>5 Others have found that high selenium may also be a problem.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7433291/‘>7

In any case, selenium deficiencies are rare except in certain parts of the world where the soil is significantly depleted. Most adults in the U.S. get at least twice the recommended daily intake.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7049795/‘>9 Three deaths were attributed to cardiomyopathies associated with low selenium.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22367552‘>11 A fourth child died after experiencing QT prolongation (abnormal heartbeat, essentially). However, QT prolongation can be triggered by acidosis,https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27873289/‘>13 Another study followed 91 children who were following a variant of the keto diet and receiving vitamin and mineral supplementation, including selenium, for 12 months.

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