This meal adds new flavors to the leftover short ribs from last week’s comfort food recipe—and pairs the ribs with a colorful slaw that offers a boost of probiotic magic.

It’s an easy, quick meal that balances the richness of short ribs with fish sauce and balsamic vinegar with the fresh crunchiness of a slaw sweetened (slightly) by our popular Primal Kitchen® Sesame Ginger Dressing. It’s a colorful and flavorful choice for a midweek dinner or a large dinner party.

Ingredients:

For Ribs

  • Leftover short ribs and broth from this companion recipe
  • 2-inches ginger root, peeled and finely chopped (5 cm)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos (30 ml)
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce (5 ml)
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (15 ml)

For Slaw

Instructions:

Add the leftover ribs and broth from earlier companion recipe along with ginger, coconut aminos, fish sauce and balsamic vinegar to the Instant Pot.

Secure the lid and make sure the pressure release valve is set to “sealing.” Select the “manual” setting and set the cooking time for 5 minutes on high pressure. After the cooking time, do a quick release by moving the pressure release valve to “venting.”

While the ribs are in the Instant Pot, make the sesame ginger slaw.

Add napa cabbage, red cabbage, chopped scallions, and diced carrot, and kimchi (optional) to a large serving bowl. Drizzle on a generous amount of Primal Kitchen Sesame Ginger Vinaigrette, and toss.

Top with sesame seeds. Take the ribs out of the pot and select the “sauté” setting. Simmer the sauce 3 to 5 minutes to thicken.

Serve the ribs, with sauce drizzled on top, and the sesame ginger slaw and kimchi on the side.

mayo_640x80

The post Instant Pot Short Ribs with Sesame Ginger Slaw appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

As you get keto-adapted, most people find the inclination to snack (at least snack frequently) decreases. But that can take a bit of time. It’s not necessarily something to expect your first week (although some folks do begin to experience the change within a few days, provided they’re eating enough overall). Still, even the most long-term keto dieters will want a snack now and then—or will replace a meal with a snack because they’ve settled into a solid keto nutritional strategy and don’t always need three regular “meals” most days.

My theory is that meals, and particularly snacks, should be simple and easy. Few of us have time to make elaborate meals every day, and when we’re living into a new eating strategy, convenience matters. In that spirit, here are 20 keto snack ideas that take 5 minutes or less to make. Enjoy! And let me know your favorite—from this list or from your own keto or Primal practice.

1. Egg Coffee

An original Primal favorite is a great keto pick-me-up for morning or afternoon. Find the recipe here.

2. Soft- or Hard-boiled Egg

It doesn’t get much easier than this. Cook up a batch on Sunday, and you’ll be set for the week.

3. Guacamole

Make it as simple as you like. Mashed avocado, sea salt and lime juice do it for me, but sometimes I’ll throw in some canned green chilis, half a tomato, and some chopped red onion, garlic or cilantro.

4. Primal Kitchen® Protein Bar

I wanted a packaged keto snack to travel with, and these have become my favorite. (This variety has nine grams of total carbs.)

5. Tuna in Avocado Half

The fat of the avocado and Primal Kitchen Mayo with the protein of tuna make this one of the more filling snacks I turn to.

6. Olives

It’s the simple things, right? Splurge on a container of your favorite olive mix.

7. Spoonful of Artisana Coconut Butter

Just when I said it didn’t get any simpler… As I’ve shared before, this is one of my favorite go-to snacks.

8. Raw Veggies and Healthy Dip/Dressing

Anyone can put this together in containers for the week. And, yup, Primal Kitchen Dressings make it easier and more flavorful.

9. Leftover Chicken Wings

Savvy keto strategy: make enough wings for the play-off games on Sunday. Enjoy the leftovers during the week. Deep fry them in avocado oil (trust me on this…) and slather on your favorite BBQ sauce.

10. 5-Minute Salad

As most of you know, I’m a big fan of Big-Ass Salads for lunch, but a lighter (and quicker) snack salad is always a possibility. An easy one to put together is spinach, pecans, red onions, feta and Primal Kitchen Balsamic Dressing.

11. Leftover Steak Strips with Bell Pepper Strips and Steak Sauce

It’s a leftover lovers dream. And I’m happy to recommend a favorite steak sauce….

12. Lox Wraps

Skip the bagel carb binge and enjoy this classic on some butter lettuce or romaine leaves with a schmear of whipped cream and your favorite toppings.

13. Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus

Save some asparagus from dinner and take ten seconds to wrap them with this deli counter favorite.

14. Macadamia Nuts

Keep a bag of them at work. They’re great with your morning coffee, too.

15. Unsweetened Nut Butter on Celery Sticks

Make enough for the kids because otherwise they’ll eat yours.

16. Cheese Crisps

Yup—five minutes or less. Buy pure cheese crisps at the store (sometimes they’ll contain nut flour), or make them at home.

17. Summer Sausage

Your childhood camping favorite is still a good option. (Look for a nitrate-free brand.)

18. California Sub Roll-Up

I like this easy roll-up idea. Works for Italian sub ingredients, too.

19. Shrimp Cocktail

Keto can be as indulgent as you want to make it. I like making my own cocktail sauce with Primal Kitchen Organic Unsweetened Ketchup.

20. Square of 85% Dark Chocolate With Unsweetened Nut Butter

You didn’t think I’d leave out the dark chocolate, did you? Perfect with an afternoon coffee or as an after-dinner keto treat…

So, tell me what I missed! What are your favorite keto-friendly go-tos? Thanks for stopping in, everybody.

mayo_640x80

The post 20 Keto Snacks (All Under 5 Minutes) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

Here are Fit Bottomed Eats, we’re lucky in that we get the scoop on new healthy foods before they hit the shelves. And, lately, we’ve seen some big trends that are starting to pop. Here are the five hottest food trends we’ve got our eyeballs on — and think you should, too! The Hottest Food Trends of 2019 1. All the functional drinks. You’ve probably already noticed that the drink aisle at your natural grocery store is like a million miles long, but prepare for it to get even longer in the New Year. From more kombuchas and fermented drinks…

The post The Hottest Food Trends of 2019 appeared first on Fit Bottomed Girls.

Powered by WPeMatico

As you and millions of other people embark on new dietary journeys, you’re going to hear a ton about calories.

“Calorie counting is everything.”

“If you aren’t counting calories, you won’t lose weight.”

“Just eat less calories than you expend.” For one, it’s “fewer.” Two, that’s not the whole picture.

These statements aren’t wrong exactly, but they offer an overly simplistic picture of the relationship between weight loss and calories. They ignore context. And context is everything, especially when you’re talking about calories and weight loss.

Most people (even many scientists) believe that the body composition challenge is a relatively simple equation: to lose weight you must reduce calories (either eat less or burn more), to gain weight you must add calories (eat more or burn less), and to maintain weight you keep calories constant (eat and burn identical amounts). Calories in over calories out.

Right away, it sounds preposterous. Are people really maintaining perfect caloric balance by dutifully tracking and comparing their intake to their burn? Are they walking six fewer steps lest they lose an extra ounce off their midsection?

Are All Calories the Same?

The truth is, it’s more like a complex equation where you have to factor in many other very important variables:

  • Am I getting calories from fat, protein, or carbs?
  • Am I getting my calories through whole foods or refined processed foods?
  • Are my glycogen stores full or empty?
  • When’s the last time I exercised?
  • Am I insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant?
  • Am I trying to lose “weight” or lose fat?
  • How’s my stress level?
  • Am I sleeping enough?

The answers to all those questions (and more) affect the fate of the calories we consume. They change the context of calories.

Ideally, all that complexity is handled under the hood. That’s how it works in wild animals. They don’t calorie count. They don’t think about what to eat or how to exercise. They just eat, move, sleep, and somehow it all works. I mean, they die, often violently, but you don’t see obese, metabolically-deranged wildlife—unless the obesity and metabolic derangement is physiological, as in bears preparing to hibernate. Somehow they figure it out. They’ve delegated the complex stuff to their subconscious.

This is generally true in “wild humans,” too. Hunter-gatherer groups by and large did not and do not show any evidence of metabolic derangement, obesity, or the other degenerative trappings of modern humans living in civilization. They are fully human in terms of physiology, so it’s not that they have special genetic adaptations that resist obesity. They’re living lifestyles and eating diets more in line with our evolutionary heritage. They’re moving around all the time, not going through drive throughs. They’re eating whole unprocessed foods that they have to procure, catch or kill.

What they don’t have is the ridiculous concept of calories and macronutrients floating around in their heads, informing their dietary choices. They don’t even think about food in terms of calories, or movement in terms of calories expended. Metabolically speaking, they consume their calories in the proper context.

But you? You might have to think about context. You might have to answer those questions and create the proper context.

Most people do not think about context. They home in on the number of calories the food database claims the food they’re eating contains, plot it against the numbers of calories the exercise database claims the exercise they’re doing expends, and then wonder why nothing’s working. That’s why “dieting doesn’t work”—because, as practiced in accordance with the expert advice from up high, it doesn’t. Almost invariably, the people who see great results from strict calorie counting, weighing and balancing, those types who frequent online weight lifting forums and have the freedom to spend hours perfecting their program, have the other relevant variables under control without realizing it.

They’re younger, with fewer responsibilities—and less stress and fewer disruptions to their sleep.

They’re lifting weights and training religiously, creating huge glycogen sinks and maintaining optimal insulin sensitivity.

They’re eating a lot of protein, the macronutrient that curbs hunger and increases energy expenditure the most.

They’re eating mostly whole foods.

They’ve had less time on this earth to accumulate metabolic damage.

Not everyone is so lucky.

Fat burning, glucose burning, ketone burning, glycogen storage, fat storage, gluconeogenesis, and protein turnover—what we do with the calories we consume—do not occur at constant rates. They ebb and flow, wax and wane in response to your micronutrient intake, macronutrient intake, energy intake, exercise and activity habits, sleep schedule, stress levels, and a dozen other factors. All of these energy-related processes are going on simultaneously in each of us at all times. But the rate at which each of these processes happens is different in each of us and they can increase or decrease depending on the context of our present circumstances and our long term goals. All of these processes utilize the same gene-based principles of energy metabolism—the biochemical machinery that we all share—but because they all involve different starting points and different inputs as well as different goals or possible outcomes, they often require different action plans. We can alter the rate at which each of these metabolic processes happens simply by changing what and when we eat and addressing the non-dietary variables. We can change the context.

But don’t controlled trials demonstrate that a “calorie is a calorie”?

People hear things like “in controlled isocaloric trials, low-carb diets have never been shown to confer a metabolic advantage or result in more weight loss than low-fat diets.” While often true, they miss the point.

People aren’t living in metabolic wards with white lab coats providing and precisely measuring all their food. They’re living in the real world, fixing their own food. Free living is entirely uncontrolled with dozens of variables bleeding in from all angles. In the lab situation, you eat what they give you, and that’s that. The situations are not analogous—real world vs. controlled lab environment.

In real world situations…

Why a Calorie Isn’t Just a Calorie

The macronutrient composition of the calories we eat alters their metabolic effects.

The metabolism of protein famously increases energy expenditure over and above the metabolism of fat or carbohydrate. For a given caloric load, protein will make you burn more energy than other macronutrients.

Protein is also more satiating than other macronutrients. Eat more protein, curb hunger, inadvertently eat less without even trying (or needing a lab coat to limit your intake).

Protein and fat together (AKA “meat”) appear to be even more satiating than either alone, almost as if we’re meant to consume fat and protein in the same meal.

The isocaloric studies tend to focus on “weight loss” and discount “fat loss.” We don’t want to lose weight. We want to lose fat and gain or retain lean muscle mass. A standard low calorie diet might cause the same amount of weight loss as a low-carb, high-fat diet (if you force the subjects to maintain isocaloric parity), but the low-carb approach has been shown to increase fat loss and enhance muscle gain. Most people who lose weight with a standard approach end up losing a significant amount of muscle along with it. Most who lose weight with a low-carb, higher-protein-and-fat approach lose mostly fat and gain or retain most of their muscle.

Take the 2004 study that placed overweight men and women on one of two diets: a very low-carb ketogenic diet or a low-fat diet. The low-carb group ate more calories but lost more weight and more body fat, especially dangerous abdominal fat.

Or the study from 1989 that placed healthy adult men on high-carb or high-fat diets. Even though the high-carb group lost slightly more body weight, the high-fat group lost slightly more body fat and retained more lean mass.

Both describe “weight lost,” but which is healthier?

Whether the calories come in the form of processed or whole food determines their effect.

We even have a study that directly examines this. For two weeks, participants either supplemented their diets with isocaloric amounts of candy (mostly sugar) or roasted peanuts (mostly fat and protein). This was added to their regular diet. After two weeks, researchers found that body weight, waist circumference, LDL, and ApoB (a rough measure of LDL particle number) were highest in the candy group, indicating increased fat mass and worsening metabolic health. In the peanut group, basal metabolic rate shot up and neither body weight nor waist size saw any significant increases.

Your current metabolic state determines the effect of calories.

In one study, a person’s metabolic reaction to high-carb or low-carb diets was determined by their degree of insulin resistance. The more insulin resistant a subject, the better they did and the more weight they lost on low-carb. The more insulin sensitive a subject, the better they did and the more weight they lost on low-fat. Calories were the same across the board.

In another study, insulin-sensitive obese patients (a rarity in the general population) were able to lose weight on either low-carb or low-fat, but insulin-resistant obese patients (very common) only lost weight on low-carb.

Whether you exercise determines the effect of calories.

If you’ve just finished a heavy lifting workout followed by a sprint session, your response to a given number of calories will differ from the person who hasn’t trained in a year.

Training: Your muscle glycogen stores will be empty, so the carbs you eat will go toward glycogen storage or directly burned, rather than inhibit fat burning. Your insulin sensitivity will be elevated, so you can move protein and carbs around without spiking insulin and inhibiting fat release. You’ll be in hypertrophy mode, so some of the protein you eat will go toward building muscle, not burned for energy.

Not Training: Your muscle glycogen stores will be full, so any carbs you eat will inhibit fat burning and be more likely to promote fat storage. Your insulin sensitivity will be low, so you’ll have to release more insulin to handle the carbs, thereby inhibiting fat burning the process. You won’t have sent any hypertrophy signals to your muscles, so the protein you eat will be wasted or burned for energy.

How you slept last night determines the effects of calories.

A single night of bad sleep is enough to:

  • Give you the insulin resistance levels of a diabetic. Try eating carbs in an insulin-resistant state and tell me a “calorie is a calorie.”
  • Make the reward system of your brain light up in response to junk food and dampen in response to healthy whole food. The more rewarding you find junk food, the more your brain will compel you to eat more of it.
  • Reduce energy expenditure. Your “calories out” drops if you sleep poorly.

And those are just a few important variables that determine the context of calories. There are many more, but this post has gone on long enough…

The Take-Home Message

If calorie-counting works for you, great! You’re one of the lucky ones. Own that and keep doing what you’re doing. You’ve clearly got a good handle on the context of calories.

If calorie-counting and weighing and measuring failed you in the past, you’re not alone and there’s a way forward. Address the variables mentioned in this post that need addressing. Do you need better sleep? Do you need to manage stress better? Could you eat more protein or fat, eat more whole food and less processed food, or get more exercise, or lift more weights, or take more walks?

Handle those variables, fix those deficiencies, and I bet that your caloric context will start making more sense. The trick isn’t to increase the number of variables you plug into your calories in/calories out formula. It’s to make sure all your lifestyle and dietary ducks are in a row so that the caloric balance works itself out.

By understanding how these metabolic processes work, and knowing that we can control the rates at which each one happens through our diet (and exercise and other lifestyle factors) we needn’t agonize over the day-to-day calorie counting. As long as we are generally eating a PB-style plan and providing the right context, our bodies will ease into a healthy, fit, long-lived comfort zone rather effortlessly.

So, what’s your caloric context looking like? Thanks for reading today, everyone.

collagenfuel_640x80

References:

Pontzer H, Wood BM, Raichlen DA. Hunter-gatherers as models in public health. Obes Rev. 2018;19 Suppl 1:24-35.

Claesson AL, Holm G, Ernersson A, Lindström T, Nystrom FH. Two weeks of overfeeding with candy, but not peanuts, increases insulin levels and body weight. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(5):598-605.

Volek J, Sharman M, Gómez A, et al. Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2004;1(1):13.

Mccargar LJ, Clandinin MT, Belcastro AN, Walker K. Dietary carbohydrate-to-fat ratio: influence on whole-body nitrogen retention, substrate utilization, and hormone response in healthy male subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1989;49(6):1169-78.

Cornier MA, Donahoo WT, Pereira R, et al. Insulin sensitivity determines the effectiveness of dietary macronutrient composition on weight loss in obese women. Obes Res. 2005;13(4):703-9.

Ebbeling CB, Leidig MM, Feldman HA, Lovesky MM, Ludwig DS. Effects of a low-glycemic load vs low-fat diet in obese young adults: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2007;297(19):2092-102.

Benedict C, Hallschmid M, Lassen A, et al. Acute sleep deprivation reduces energy expenditure in healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(6):1229-36.

***This article was substantially revised from the original version, which you can read here.

The post Are All Calories the Same? appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

Eggs are an easy and nutritious breakfast, but some mornings a plate of eggs just isn’t what your body craves. Viva variety!

These delicious keto breakfasts are either egg-free or include eggs as a minor ingredient. From keto pancakes, muffins and hot cereal to breakfast sausage and keto pizza, keto breakfasts have never tasted so good.

Bacon Pancakes

These savory bacon pancakes are served with a dollop of sour cream, a sprinkle of chives and a hit of hot sauce. Fluffy and salty, they’re a perfect breakfast for weekends.

Nutritional Info: (2 servings—3 pancakes per serving) Total fat: 21.1 g | Net carbs: 3.4 g | Protein: 19.2 g

Blueberry Keto Muffins

These truly delicious Keto blueberry muffins are a treat worth getting out of bed for. Plenty of butter and cream give these gluten-free, low carb muffins a decadently rich texture.

Nutritional Info: (1 muffin) Total fat: 27.7 g | Net carbs: 5 g | Protein: 7.8 g

Golden Coconut Collagen Latte

A warm and soothing start to the morning, this protein-packed latte combines the nourishing benefits of both turmeric and Primal Kitchen® Collagen Fuel.

Nutritional Info: (1 Serving) Total fat: 5.1 g | Net carbs: 2.4 g | Protein: 11.4 g

Primal Keto Bread

Toasted Primal keto bread is a buttery slice of heaven. Go sweet with the cinnamon version of Primal keto bread, or savory with a garlic and herb version.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 18.9 g | Net carbs: 2.4 g | Protein: 8.2 g

Homemade Breakfast Sausage

Homemade sausage is sugar and additive free, and for convenience can be made ahead of time and frozen. These flavorful patties are filling on their own and don’t have to be served on a plate with eggs.

Nutritional Info: (1 sausage?) Total fat: 24.2 g | Net carbs: 0 g | Protein: 30.7 g

Summer Breakfast Meatloaf

Meatloaf is an easy breakfast to make ahead of time, and then slice each morning for a protein-rich satisfying start to the day.

Nutritional Info: (1 sausage?) Total fat: 40.9 g | Net carbs: 3.3 g | Protein: 32.7 g

Greek Meatza

Before cauliflower pizza crust, there was meatza. This recipe deserves to be brought back from the past because it’s so darn good, and because it makes pizza for breakfast a keto reality. Serve Greek meatza for dinner then enjoy cold slice of pizza (or, “meatza”) for breakfast the next day.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 25.7 g | Net carbs: 4.3 g | Protein: 31 g

Pizza Dutch Baby

Another pizza-for-breakfast option, this keto pizza Dutch baby is light and fluffy and flavored with Parmesan, mozzarella and fresh basil.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 25.7 g | Net carbs: 4.3 g | Protein: 31 g

Chia Flax Hot Pudding

This warm bowl of healthy goodness serves up enough protein, fat and fiber to satisfy until lunch. Optional topping like pecans and fresh berries give this healthy breakfast pudding a dessert-like flavor.

Nutritional Info: 1 serving Total fat: 35.7 g | Net carbs: 7.6 g | Protein: 22.3g

Keto Porridge

If you’re craving oatmeal or hot cereal, this keto porridge is what your body really wants. Made with richly flavorful ingredients like almond butter and coconut, this anti-inflammatory porridge also contains bee pollen, turmeric and hemp seeds.

Nutritional Info: 2 servings Total fat: 50.2 g | Net carbs: 6 g | Protein: 14.8 g

Blueberry Muffin Smoothie

No time to make blueberry muffins? Then try a satiating blueberry muffin smoothie made with healthy Primal Kitchen® Collagen Fuel.

Nutritional Info: 1 Serving Total fat: 31.4 g | Net carbs: 12 g | Protein: 23 g

collagenfuel_640x80

The post 11 Keto Breakfasts (That Aren’t Eggs) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

Last month, I gave a heads up about what I’m calling the Keto Kickoff—a quick and comprehensive 7-day dive into the ketogenic diet, a pure distillation of the lessons contained in The Keto Reset Diet book. That starts next Monday (sign-up closes Sunday night 1/6/19), and it assumes, but does not require, an audience without any formal experience in the ketogenic diet.

What about a similar-but-different-enough population—those who have tried keto, stopped for any number of reasons, and want back on the wagon? Should those looking to restart keto do or know anything different?

First and foremost, the basics still apply. Anyone looking to restart keto should pay attention to all the stuff I’ve covered in previous posts and books and will be covering in the Keto Kickoff email series (so sign up today!). Going keto is going keto.

What’s the most important step someone trying to restart a ketogenic diet needs to follow before doing anything else? Identify why you fell off the wagon in the first place. Then address it.

That’s really what sets you apart from the average keto beginner—your preexisting hangups. If anything, you’ll have a better physiological response to the ketogenic diet because your body retains knowledge. Some of that metabolic machinery is still there, still functioning, once you shake off the rust.

But you do need to figure out and overcome what tripped you up the first place.

People have dozens of potential reasons for quitting keto. I can’t possibly cover them all, but I can address and offer solutions for the most common ones.

It Was Challenging Figuring Out How To Eat With Friends, Family, and Colleagues

The people who give this reason usually fall into one of two camps. Either they’re too agreeable and give in to peer pressure (imagined or real) at the drop of a hat, making it impossible to get into any sort of keto rhythm; or they’re too rigid, turning every social excursion with food into an epic battle of will that eventually breaks them. The former group needs to toughen up. The latter group needs to lighten up.

Avoid rigidity and timidity. Stand firm and be resolute in your convictions about what diet makes you feel best; don’t be afraid to say “no” or order a salad with four meat patties when everyone else is getting pizza. In the vast majority of these cases the only one making you feel awkward is yourself. Most people don’t care. And if they do care, it’s probably because they’re intrigued and want to know more. Besides, going keto isn’t such a foreign concept these days. You may even have secret compatriots present who are also restarting keto.

Stick it out for three or four weeks and then lighten up. Once you’ve re-established your ketogenic metabolism and achieved metabolic flexibility, it won’t hurt (that much) to drift in and out on special occasions. You should be able to bounce back relatively quickly after a dalliance with carbs at happy hour, or Thanksgiving, or a birthday party. Just try to stick to healthy Primal sources of carbs to make the transition that much easier.

It Stopped Working

Sometimes keto stops working. An understandable reaction is to stop doing keto. It’s not the ideal move, but it makes sense.

If you’re thinking about restarting keto after a hiatus, and the reason you stopped in the first place was that keto stopped working, you probably have some bad habits or misconceptions to overcome.

  • You ate too much fat. A common trajectory among keto dieters who plateau is that they overdo the fat. Early on in keto, anything you eat seems to promote weight loss. The extra fat in those early days even upregulates the fat-burning of your mitochondria, speeding up the keto adaptation process. You’re eating more fat than you ever have before, and you only seem to be growing more powerful. It’s a profound sensation. But as you keep eating more and more fat, you plateau. As you attempt your keto restart, remember that getting into ketosis is more about the carbs you don’t eat than the fat you do. Calories don’t stop counting on keto.
  • You ate too little protein. Protein absolutely can inhibit ketosis, but it takes more than you think. Ketosis is protein-sparing, but you still need to eat it. And some people can get away with far more protein than others and still remain firmly in ketosis. The oft-given blanket advice to “limit protein” can really throw some people for a loop and lead to keto “not working.” Too low a protein intake on keto can reduce performance in the gym, limit or even reverse muscle hypertrophy, increase appetite, and make it hard to construct a palatable meal. If that sounds like you, try eating a bit more protein when you do your keto restart.

It Felt Too Restrictive

Not to toot my own horn too much, but this is one of the main reasons why I developed the Primal Kitchen line. Having an arsenal of reliable, convenient, and most importantly healthy mayos, dressings, sauces, and marinades promotes dietary variability. You end up eating a wider range of meats, vegetables, and other keto-friendly foods when you can modify their taste and presentation by flipping open the top of a bottle of dressing or mixing in some mayo. Meal monotony is a deal breaker for many people on any diet, including keto.

It Was “Too Hard”

That’s about as vague a complaint as you can get, but it’s very common.  Going keto forces a totally new way of looking at your food, at your conception of energy, even your experience of the world. Your breath changes. Your grocery shopping routine changes. Three-quarters of the food at your favorite restaurant is suddenly off-limits. Then there’s the salt, potassium, and other electrolytes to worry about.

If you found keto to be just too hard to get a handle on, you’re not alone. Sign up for the Keto Kickoff, refresh your knowledge of the basics (and see what you were overlooking, if anything), get daily support, and do your keto restart right.

You Just Drifted Away

Things snowball, don’t they? You have a quarter of a donut at work because it’s just a quarter of a donut and it’s your favorite kind and it’s free. You get home and taste test the mac-and-cheese you made for your kids a few times, then finish their plate because, hey, it was only a couple more bites and refrigerated mac-and-cheese gets weird. Before you realize it, you’ve eaten refined carbohydrates every single day, haven’t lost a pound, and you can’t rightfully call yourself keto.

Keto drift happens, and it demands a restart. To prevent it from happening again, remember why you wanted to go keto in the first place:

For the fat loss…

For the improved energy…

For the metabolic flexibility…

For the freedom from hunger…

For the potential for a long, healthy, active life…

When you’re ready to get serious, get moving.

It Never Worked…As I Tried It

This is rare, but not inconceivable. Occasionally, a diet doesn’t work.

If keto truly doesn’t work for you, no matter how faithfully or optimally you implement it, don’t do it. Ketosis is still a good state to visit, so just be sure to implement some other method of entering ketosis even if you’re not going to restart the keto diet, whether it’s intermittent fasting, intense exercise (with precautions), caloric restriction, or simply not snacking all the time.

Do make sure you gave it a good three-week try, however, before concluding that “it doesn’t work for me.” That’s the minimum amount of time you need to know if it’s a good fit. If you didn’t give it three full and earnest weeks, sign up for the Keto Kickoff (opportunity for sign up closes January 6th!), and see what additional guidance and support can do for your process.

For those interested in beginning the new year with the Keto Reset Diet library of books, for a limited time all the original bonus gifts—ebooks, audio, video and Primal Kitchen discount codes—for each book (The Keto Reset Diet, The Keto Reset Cookbook, and the The Keto Reset Instant Pot Cookbook) are available with purchase again.

Thanks for reading today, everyone. Are you restarting keto? Trying it for the first time? Committing to another deep dive after a successful keto experience before? I’d love to hear your stories, questions and tips for all who are taking up keto in the new year.

paleobootcampcourse_640x80

The post How to Restart Keto appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

It’s that time of year again. People are starting to think about the new year ahead, which always goes hand in hand with resolutions aimed at improving health and fitness. I have an idea: Why not make metabolic flexibility your goal for 2019?

Metabolic flexibility refers to the ability to efficiently use different substrates for energy. Once you free yourself from carbohydrate dependency, you can enjoy sustained energy throughout the day. You can skip a meal or two—or even engage in longer fasts—comfortably. Add to this the ability to supercharge your fitness and sports performance, plus burn excess body fat without the deprivation of a traditional diet mentality.

Sounds great, right? “But Mark,” I hear you asking, “If I’ve already been following the Primal Blueprint for a while, am I not metabolically flexible already?” Yes, you are undoubtedly better at burning fat than the average person nowadays…. BUT (and this is a big but) unless you’ve embarked on a period of dedicated very low carb ketogenic eating, there is still another level of metabolic flexibility waiting to be unleashed. This is the whole reason I wrote The Keto Reset Diet last year—to help people reach the pinnacle of metabolic flexibility, where they can harness the power of fat and ketones for energy (along with glucose as needed, of course).

I strongly believe that it’s in most people’s best interest to periodically dip into ketosis and do a Keto Reset at least once or twice per year. Of course, as so many of you can attest, it’s possible to achieve tremendous gains to health, body composition, fitness, cognition, and general wellness by following a traditional Primal eating pattern (which puts most people in the range of 50 to 150 grams per day of carbs, give or take). Nevertheless, research and anecdotal evidence continues to shed light on the unique benefits that come from being in a state of ketosis at least some of the time.

These days, I move seamlessly between a slightly higher carb Primal profile and ketogenic macros without thinking too much about it. I’m able to do so specifically because I’ve built the metabolic machinery that allows me to use fat and ketones and, yes, carbs for energy. Truly, this is the best I’ve ever felt (and I was feeling pretty darn good before my keto experiment). I want the same flexibility and freedom for all of you.

That’s why I invite you to join me this January for my Keto Reset Kickoff, a FREE one-week introduction to the keto diet—done the Primal way. Maybe you’re curious about keto, or perhaps you already attempted keto without success, or you tried to learn about it on your own but got mired down trying to wade through all the information online. In any case, the Keto Reset Kickoff is for you! I’ll cut through the noise and give you the real skinny on going keto, as well as how to avoid common pitfalls and maximize your success.

Simply sign up now at primalkitchen.com/ketoreset. Starting January 7, I’ll send one easy lesson per day to your inbox for seven days. By the end of the week you’ll understand the basics of keto and why I designed the Keto Reset the way I did. Then if you decide to go for it, my colleague Lindsay Taylor will be leading a full Keto Reset in our Facebook community starting right after the Keto Reset Kickoff. (Join the community now to get all your questions answered and hit the ground running in 2019 in a supportive environment.)

When you sign up for the Keto Reset Kickoff, I’ll also send you the Keto Reset Kickoff Pregame package that includes:

  • The Pregame ebook that will help you set the stage for success by getting on track with your Primal eating
  • A journal to help you plan for success during a Keto Reset

But wait, there’s more! (Sorry, I couldn’t help myself.) I’m giving everyone who enrolls a chance to get the Keto Reset Online Mastery Course for FREE (that a $147 value) with the purchase of a Primal Kitchen Advanced Keto Kit. You get my absolute favorite keto-friendly products, plus the most comprehensive multimedia educational experience around, designed for anyone interested in the ketogenic diet. It’s an unbelievable deal.

Even if you’re still on the fence about keto, I encourage you to sign up for the Keto Reset Kickoff and learn more about it. I’m eager to share the Keto Reset approach with you so you can decide for yourself if you’re ready to dip into that lower end of my Primal Blueprint Carbohydrate Curve and go keto in 2019. 

Thanks for being here, everybody. Lindsay and I look forward to you joining us in January!

ketoreset_640x80

The post Join Us For the FREE 2019 Keto Kickoff! (Plus, A Keto Deal You Won’t Believe…) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico