Work up a serious sweat using your own bodyweight with this do-anywhere series.

The holiday season presents plenty of obstacles to overcome — including inclement weather that may keep you stuck in the house or vacations that leave you with no gym access. Don’t let this stop you from staying fit.

Whether you’re stuck at home, at the airport, in a hotel room or laying poolside on a family getaway, you don’t need any equipment to accomplish a solid training session.

Here are nine exercises that when performed in a circuit, they create a challenging — and rewarding — 30- to 45-minute workout. Depending on your fitness level and goals, you can perform this workout in a superset style (back-to-back with little to no rest).

Glute Bridge

Glute Bridge

Start on the ground with your feet flat on the floor and your knees bent with your arms at your sides. Push your hips up to the sky, keeping your core tight without arching your back and come back down to the ground. Extra credit: Squeeze and hold at the top for two seconds. Repeat 10 to 12 times.

Squat With a Hold

Squat With a Hold

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, your chest elevated and your core tight. Drop your hips down and back into a seated position. Hold five to 10 seconds and then return to the start position. Repeat 10 to 12 times.

Reverse Lunge With Knee-Up

Reverse Lunge With Knee-Up

Start with your feet together and bring one leg back into a lunge position. Maintain 90-degree angles with both legs. Keep your chest elevated. Then return to the starting position and bring that same-side knee up. Repeat on the same leg 10 to 12 times and then switch legs.

Push-Up With One Leg Extended

Push-Up With One Leg Extended

Start in a plank position with your hands shoulder-width apart. Center one foot and lift the other leg up, keeping it straight. Move into a push-up, bending at the elbows and coming down 90 degrees, keeping your core tight and your extended leg straight. Perform 10 to 12 times and then repeat holding the opposite leg up.

Triceps Dip

Triceps Dip

Sit in a chair or on the edge of a table with your hands on either side of your body. Slide your hips slightly off and away. Dip down, bending your elbows as far as comfortable, keeping your chest elevated, and then push back up to the starting position. Repeat 10 to 12 times.

Super Plank

Super Plank

Start in a plank position with your hands and feet shoulder-width apart. Bring your body down onto your elbows, still maintaining that tight core and plank position. Then push back up into a plank on your hands. Make sure to switch sides each time you come down and up from each plank position. Perform for 20 to 30 seconds.

Plank Jack

Plank Jack

Start in a plank position with your hands shoulder-width apart and feet together. Hop your feet out, keeping the plank position intact, and hop your feet back together. Perform for 20 to 30 seconds.

Mountain Climber

Mountain Climber

Start in a plank position with your hands and feet shoulder-width apart. Bring one knee up to your chest, then switch the other knee up to your chest, adding a hop in between. Perform for 20 to 30 seconds.

Flutter Kick

Flutter Kick

Lie on the ground with your legs straight. Bring one leg up at a time, alternating back and forth. Don’t bring your legs up too far. Keep them close to the ground. Make sure you don’t arch your back. Lift each leg 10 to 12 times. Alternatively, you can perform a 6-inch hold, holding your legs 6 inches off the ground for 20 seconds.

You can stay on track this winter season by using your best resource: your body. Practice this circuit first thing in the morning so you can avoid excuses and enjoy the rest of your day with family! Bonus: Get your loved ones involved to make it that much more fun!

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Veteran “skipper” Kim Corbin shares the story of Ro Gammond, a seasoned runner who plans to skip an entire half marathon in honor of her 70th birthday.

Kim “Skipper” Corbin and her skipping group in San Francisco. 

When we’re kids, we skip when we play and we skip down the sidewalk without giving it a second thought. So why do the majority of us stop skipping as adults?

It’s been more than 20 years since a friend spontaneously broke into a skip and invited me to join along on a Friday night in San Francisco. It was the first time I had skipped since childhood, and the experience was so exhilarating that I started organizing group skipping events and created a website called iSkip.com with the intention of starting a worldwide skipping craze.

As it turned out, there were hundreds of people from all over the world who had already been skipping for years, whether for fitness or just for fun. ISkip.com has been celebrating their accomplishments while encouraging ever-increasing numbers of adults to put a skip in their step ever since. So you can imagine my delight when 69-year-old Ro Gammond from Richmond, Virginia, contacted me to share her intention of skipping a half marathon to celebrate the fact that she’ll be turning 70 this fall.

“I’ve already completed marathons, half marathons, an ultra and a triathlon, and I’ve also been an age group winner, so I couldn’t think of anything that would be a new challenge to celebrate entering a new decade,” Gammond says. “I thought about running 70 miles, but that idea still centered around running, and I wanted to do something different. Then one day out of the blue, it hit me! I would skip a half marathon!”

Ro Gammond, 69, showing off her skipping form.

Gammond registered for the Chartway Norfolk Harbor Half Marathon, which is taking place on November 18, 2018, in Virginia, and headed to the internet to research skipping for fitness. She quickly found iSkip.com and contacted me in search of long-distance skipping advice.

A long-distance skipper I am not, so I turned to Ashrita Furman, who set the first Guinness World Record for skipping the fastest marathon in 2003, and the handful of other skippers I have met through the years who skip for more than 5 miles at a time. I sent Gammond their input.

I also sent her the results of a recent research study at East Carolina University that compared skipping to running. The study found that skipping burns 20 percent more calories than running at the same speed for the same time and that skipping has reduced knee loads compared to running, which may help reduce the rate of running injuries if people run a little less and skip a little more.

Gammond started training in earnest shortly after we connected. “Since the race is in November, I’m currently working on my training schedule for endurance and speed,” Gammond says. “I’m using an interval method where I skip for 30 seconds, run for 30 seconds and walk for 30 seconds. Once the weather cools down and as the half marathon gets closer, I will adjust those interval lengths accordingly.”

I recently had a chance to check in with Gammond to see how her training is coming along, and while she said skipping is a lot harder than she realized, she was still committed to her half-marathon mission. She’s really enjoying how different skipping is from running and can hardly wait for all the fun that race day is sure to bring.

Gammond’s zest for life and enthusiasm about her skipping challenge inspires me to no end. She’s a powerful example of how it’s never too late to break out of our routine to try something new. I hope you’ll join me in cheering her on from the virtual sidelines. Skip on, Ro! Go! Go! Go!

Looking for a new fitness challenge of your own? Ready to give skipping a try? Here are a few skip tips, whether you are skipping hand in hand with your kids down the sidewalk, skipping on the treadmill, or skipping for miles and miles at a time.

Stay low and go slow

Resist the urge to bounce high into the air. Low-to-the-ground skips, during which your feet barely leave the ground, are much more efficient. Keeping your arm movements to a minimum will also help.

Take it easy

There is no need to skip for miles right away. Instead, try blending short skipping intervals into walking and/or running routines, especially when you’re first starting out. You also can blend walking and skipping by walking two steps, skipping two steps, walking two steps, skipping two steps, and so on.

Don’t worry. Be happy

The most important thing to remember is that skipping is fun and uplifting by nature. The very best measure of a good skipping workout is not distance, speed or loft. Rather, it’s the quality of presence, freedom and/or glee experienced in each moment that has the power to turn a good skip into a great one.

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The 4-Move Workout to Improve Grip Strength
C Flanigan / Getty

When it comes to dominating an obstacle course race (OCR), your ability to hang is paramount. And that comes down to your grip strength—whether it’s swinging from the monkey bars or climbing up a rope, having well-conditioned forearms is a must.

According to Hunter McIntyre, a professional endurance athlete and Tough Mudder X champion, a good benchmark to determine if you’re ready for OCRs is whether you can do one “Frenchie pullup.”
Here’s how to do it: To start, hang from a bar and pull up. Then slowly lower yourself until your arms form a 45-degree angle. Without lowering yourself to the bottom, pull up again until your arms are
at a 90-degree angle. Repeat again, this time so you form 135 degrees. Then go up one last time and drop.

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If your progress is slow, don’t get frustrated, and remember that you can use a resistance band if necessary.

Once you do have the strength, all you need is the ability to harness it. “It’s important for you to have controlled power,” says McIntyre, who suggests finding two bars, with one that’s about a foot above the other, and practicing the transition between the two as slowly and carefully as possible. Now give it a go.

The Grip Strength Workout

Looking to blast your forearms while also getting a full-body pump? Perform this McIntyre-approved circuit three to five times through without putting the kettlebell down at any point.

  • 10 kettlebell cleans (one kettlebell in each hand)
  • 15 to 20 lunges (kettlebells in either front rack or farmer’s carry position)
  • 10 box stepups (kettlebells at your side)
  • As many pullups or legless rope climbs as possible (To be competitive for elite races, you need to hit at least 20, McIntyre says.)

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Anytime Arnold Schwarzenegger has a gym video, it’s a big deal for fitness enthusiasts. And whenever he has a message for LeBron James—even better.

In his latest Instagram video, the Austrian Oak filmed himself pumping out some lat pulldowns before delivering a message to King James and his new Los Angeles teammates: Make the Lakers great again.

Even if you have no interest in basketball, you have to respect one thing—Arnold’s still got a set of pythons on him. Check it out:

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Sylvester Stallone Chaos Watch and Pen
MontegrappaItalia/YouTube

Pens—everybody needs a few, right? You’ve got grocery lists to write and Batman doodles to draw during boring work meetings. But chances are the pen in your hand costs about $1 and isn’t decorated with human skulls or have a crazy commercial where it was birthed from the lava of an active volcano.

Then again, your pen also wasn’t designed by Sylvester Stallone.

In the commercial below, you’ll see what happens when Sly designed his very own pen and watch set for the Italian luxury peddlers at Montegrappa. This video’s existed since 2013, but it’s only now really picked up steam online—we caught it, courtesy of Uproxx.

The whole video is—in a word—baffling. It starts with Stallone narrating a monologue about life and death, war and peace, light and darkness—all lofty subjects that don’t necessarily lend themselves to the sale of writing instruments. But hey, we also didn’t write Rocky

After the speech, we’re taken on a lavish ride through some mid-‘90s CGI, where we see the forging of the pen bedazzled in gaudy skulls and golden dragon ornamentations, with buzzwords like “Majestic” and “Imposing” flashing across the screen. It all builds to a money shot of Stallone showing off both the watch and the pen with the name “Chaos” in font that can only be described as “’90s Nu Metal Chic.”

And how much would Stallone’s “Chaos” set you back now? Well both the pen and watch are going for close to $6,000 on eBay right now. Tough decision, right?

Check out the commercial below:

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