FDA Ordered to Return Five Truckloads of DMAA to Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals
Witthaya Prasongsin

This week, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, Georgia, handed down a ruling that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must return $19 million worth of products containing DMAA (1,3-Dimethylamylamine) that the government agency seized from Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals back in October 2017. Though the sale of DMAA is still prohibited, the manner in which the FDA seized Hi-Tech’s property was declared unlawful by the court, leading to the return of what was originally five tractor-trailers worth of their products.

Hi-Tech’s CEO, Jared Wheat, called the FDA’s seizure of the ingredient, “an extreme act of overreach.” He continued, “This is not about mistakes. This is not about negligence. This is not about incompetence. This is about intentional wrongdoing.”

In a press release sent out by the company, Hi-Tech summed up its position by saying, “In short, the Government has not adequately explained its reasons for keeping Defendants’ property in a state of limbo for eighteen months.”

For more from Wheat, you can check out a video from Hi-Tech’s Instagram page below.

No

Powered by WPeMatico

Last week, I linked to a story about a popular vegan blogger, author, and influencer who found herself going into menopause at the age of 37 despite doing “everything right.” She exercised, she ate raw, she avoided gluten and refined sugar, and, most importantly, she avoided all animal products. Now, this wasn’t a randomized controlled trial. This wasn’t even a case study. But it was a powerful anecdote from someone whose livelihood depended on her remaining a raw vegan. It wasn’t in her interest to make it up.

So, it got me wondering: How do diet and lifestyle influence the timing of menopause?

Now, before I begin, let’s just state the obvious: Menopause isn’t a problem to be avoided. It’s not something to be feared or maligned. It’s not “the end.” I wrote an entire series on menopause last year, and there will always be more to come on the subject because it’s an important time of life with its own questions and possibilities. While it’s a natural, evolutionarily-preserved part of being a woman, it also follows a natural cadence. Menopause at the right time in accordance with your genetics is normal, expected, and healthy. Menopause that occurs earlier than your genetics would direct suggests something is amiss. Sure enough, early or premature menopause—defined in most places as menopause before the age of 40—has a number of troubling links to poor health outcomes.

Early menopause is linked to:

Not to mention that all the other things normally associated with menopause, like osteoporosis and changes in mood, also have the potential to occur, only earlier.

Okay, so early menopause can have some health consequences. Is veganism actually linked?

What Research Says About Diet and Menopause Timing

There was one study that found people who’d never been a vegetarian developed menopause at a later age, which is a roundabout way of saying that vegetarianism may increase the risk of early menopause.

Other lifestyle factors linked to later menopause included regular strenuous exercise, never smoking, midlife weight gain, and drinking alcohol. Strange mix of behaviors, both classically healthy and unhealthy.

But then another study in Han Chinese women found the opposite—that vegetarianism was associated with a lower risk of premature menopause.

Those are the only direct (if you can call it that) lines of evidence, and they conflict. No solid answers there. That said, there’s more indirect stuff pointing toward a link between exclusion of animal foods and earlier menopause:

  • A high intake of vitamin D and calcium from dietary sources has been linked to a lower risk of premature menopause. Oddly enough, supplemental vitamin D and calcium were not linked to lower risks, suggesting that it’s the food—dairy primarily, but also bone-in small fatty fish like sardines—and not the nutrients alone. So a vegan might not be in the clear simply by supplementing with D and calcium.
  • The amount of protein and carbs a woman eats throughout her life seems to predict the age at which menopause occurs. More protein, later menopause. More carbs, earlier menopause. Protein is harder and carbs are easier to come by on a plant-based diet—that’s for sure.
  • Another fairly consistent finding is that polyunsaturated fat intake “accelerates” menopause. Women who eat the most PUFA tend to have menopause earlier. High PUFA intakes are pretty unavoidable when your diet is awash in seeds, nuts, and other plant-based fat sources.

Then there was a different connection in another study.

The Nurses Health Study found that women who ate the most plant protein were more likely to avoid premature menopause; animal protein intake had no effect. They even found beneficial links between specific foods and protection against early menopause, including dark bread, cold cereal, and pasta. Those are about as unPrimal as you can get.

How Can We Make Sense of Conflicting Research?

In addition to smoking (which we all know is trouble for almost all markers of health), one thing that keeps appearing in all these observational studies—and they’re all observational studies, unable to prove causation—is that underweight BMIs predict early menopause. In the Nurses Health Study, for example, BMIs under 18.5 were linked to a 30% greater risk of early menopause and BMIs between 25 and 29 were linked to a 30% lower risk. If that’s true, and if that’s actually a causal factor, then the most important thing a woman who wants to avoid early menopause can do is avoid being underweight. In that case, filling up on foods known to cause weight gain in susceptible people like bread, pasta, and cereal would be protective (at least for early menopause).

And that could really explain why the vegan blogger developed premature menopause. In her own words, she “had run out of fuel.”

A big downfall of many plant-based diets is that they starve you. They starve you of vital micronutrients you can really only get in animal foods, like B12, zinc, creatine, cholesterol, and others. They starve you of vital macronutrients, like protein and animal fat. And they starve you of calories. It’s hard to maintain your weight and physical robustness eating a diet of leaves, twigs, and seeds (unless you’re a gorilla). Oddly enough, I think vegans who eat grains and vegan “junk food” like fake burgers and weird nut cheeses are probably better off than the gluten-free ones who live off salads, simply because they’re getting more calories. It’s true that there are many ways to eat vegetarian and even vegan—and some are healthier than others (I’ve written about Primal recommendations for vegetarians and vegans in the past), but the more restrictive a person is with animal products, the trickier it will be to stay well-nourished.

If I had to make a bet, it’d be that any diet that provides sufficient nourishment in the form of micronutrients, macronutrients, and total calories will help stave off early menopause.

What about you? What’s your take on this? Has anyone out there experienced premature/early menopause that didn’t follow natural, familial patterns? What can you recall about the diet and lifestyle leading up to it?

BBQ_Sauces_640x80

References:

Wang H, Chen H, Qin Y, et al. Risks associated with premature ovarian failure in Han Chinese women. Reprod Biomed Online. 2015;30(4):401-7.

Velez MP, Alvarado BE, Rosendaal N, et al. Age at natural menopause and physical functioning in postmenopausal women: the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. Menopause. 2019;

Sujarwoto S, Tampubolon G. Premature natural menopause and cognitive function among older women in Indonesia. J Women Aging. 2019;:1-15.

Løkkegaard E, Jovanovic Z, Heitmann BL, Keiding N, Ottesen B, Pedersen AT. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: influence of Hormone Therapy. Maturitas. 2006;53(2):226-33.

Purdue-smithe AC, Whitcomb BW, Szegda KL, et al. Vitamin D and calcium intake and risk of early menopause. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(6):1493-1501.

Sapre S, Thakur R. Lifestyle and dietary factors determine age at natural menopause. J Midlife Health. 2014;5(1):3-5.

Boutot ME, Purdue-smithe A, Whitcomb BW, et al. Dietary Protein Intake and Early Menopause in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Am J Epidemiol. 2018;187(2):270-277.

Szegda KL, Whitcomb BW, Purdue-smithe AC, et al. Adult adiposity and risk of early menopause. Hum Reprod. 2017;32(12):2522-2531.

The post Does Diet Influence Menopause Timing? appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

Powered by WPeMatico

Woman Lifting Weights With Dumbbells

Mike Harrington / Getty

Trying to tighten and firm up all over?  With the help of trainer and nutritionist Kim Oddo—who has worked with some of the world’s top figure and bikini competitors—we’ll show you how to get your buff bod back in only four weeks with this comprehensive crash-course training program.

Coupled with a strategis nutrition plan, it’ll have your body sweating and (at times) your stomach grumbling, but in 28 days, you’ll surprise yourself when you see how far your figure has come.

The 4-week program is divided into a pair of 2-week chunks. Here are the weekly splits:

Weeks 1-2

DAY 1: Upper-body Circuit, Abs

DAY 2: Lower-body Circuit

DAY 3: Cardio, Abs

DAY 4: Upper-body Circuit, Abs

DAY 5: Lower-body Circuit

DAY 6: Cardio, Abs

DAY 7: Rest

Important Points

  • Use light weight and higher reps at the beginning of the workout to help enhance blood flow to muscles and burn more calories as you train. 
  • With each circuit, you’ll go heavier and use lower reps to stimulate your fast-twitch muscle fibers and keep your body in fat-burning mode after the workout is over. 
    • The reps for each movement are specified separated by commas in the workouts below.
  • Focus on compound movements to maximize the amount of work done in this short, full-body routine.
  • To keep your heart rate up, you’ll perform five minutes of cardio between each circuit at 70–75% maximum heart rate (MHR).
  • Use an average tempo like 2-1-2 (two seconds to lower the weight, one second pause, and two seconds to lift it) to ensure you perform each exercise properly.
  • Perform 45–60 minutes of cardio on your cardio days, working at 75% of your MHR.

Weeks 3-4

DAY 1: Upper-body Circuit, Abs

DAY 2: Lower-body Plyometrics Circuit

DAY 3: Cardio, Abs

DAY 4: Upper-body Plyometrics Circuit, Abs

DAY 5: Lower-body Circuit

DAY 6: Cardio, Abs

DAY 7: Rest

Important Points

  • Increase the amount of weight for both your upper- and lower-body circuits, and go heavier and use lower reps with each circuit.
  • After your body has acclimatized to faster-paced workouts, you’ll start plyometrics—exercises that are quick, powerful movements that help the muscles store energy for more explosive training.
  • Plyos give you a total cardio workout, so you won’t have to hit the treadmill afterward unless you feel you need to.
  • To keep your heart rate up and calories burning during the workout, you’ll perform five minutes of cardio between each circuit on the treadmill, StepMill, or elliptical at 70–75% of your MHR.
  • Make sure to warm up for a minimum of five minutes on the treadmill, StepMill, or elliptical before beginning your first circuit.
  • Perform 45–60 minutes of cardio on a treadmill, StepMill, or elliptical on your cardio days at 75% of your MHR.
No
Topics: 

Powered by WPeMatico

10 Deadlift Mistakes to Avoid
martin-dm / Getty

The deadlift is easily one of the most covered topics here at M&F, and rightfully so – this mass-maker builds functional and postural strength and triggers the release of muscle-building and fat-burning hormones like testosterone and growth hormone. Regardless of how you deadlift, the gains tend to come quickly.

The deadlift holds a dual distinction: it is arguably the best and yet most often misused exercise in the gym. With all of its variations in benefits it is a lift to build every program on, regardless of experience or skill level. But how exactly do you program it into your own workout for best results? Here are a few simple strategies to follow, along with a few sample workouts.

1. Start With It

Most of the time, and with very few exceptions, it pays to lead off your workout with deadlifts. That’s because you always want to do the most neural demanding exercises first and the deadlift is enormously taxing on your central nervous system (CNS). This sample workout leads off with the deadlift, allowing you to plow through it while you’re fresh, and focuses on the posterior chain.

Exercise

Sets

Reps        

Deadlift

4

6-8

Lying Hamstring Curl – Superset w/

4

8-10

Kettlebell Swing

4

12-15

Wide Stance Good Morning       

3

12-15

Calf Raise  

3

8-10

 

2. Stand Alone

A lot of fitness experts will challenge clients to perform the deadlift as part of a superset or a circuit, which tends to limit how much weight you can (and probably should) pull. Most of the time you should do the deadlift as a standalone exercise, working your way through all of your prescribed sets before moving on to another exercise. This is especially the case with newer lifters, who stand to gain more from the neural adaptations that the deadlift brings on. This lower-body workout pits man versus barbell for four heavy sets before finishing off your lower body with an array of other exercises.

Exercise

Sets

Reps        

Deadlift

4

6-8

Squat (Heels Elevated) Superset w/

4

8-10

Romanian Deadlift

4

8-10

Split Squat – Superset w/      

4

8-10 (each leg)

45-Degree Back Ext. with Band

4

8-10

Petersen Step-Up – Superset w/

4 8-10 (each leg)

Calf Raise

4 8-10

3. Superset It

Having established that it’s generally good practice to perform all of your working sets of the deadlift first (before moving on to other moves), it’s not out of the question to occasionally superset the deadlift with moves like the lying hamstring curl, chin-up, or knee dominant exercises like the walking lunge. The deadlift is a lower body, hip dominate exercise so these three exercises (as well as others) can be good complement exercises to perform in the context of a superset. 

Exercise

Sets

Reps        

Deadlift – Superset w/

4

6-8

Chinup

4

6-8

Front Squat – Superset w/

4

6-8

Dip     

4

6-8

Walking Lunge – Superset w/

4

8-10 (each leg)

Barbell Row

4 8-10 

Lying Hamstring Curl – Superset w/

4

8-10

Incline Dumbbell Press

4 6-8

Some tips to remember when it comes to picking things up and putting them down on deadlift day.

1. The deadlift always starts and ends from the floor. Allow the bar to come to a deliberate stop between reps.

2. At the start and finish position the shoulders should be slightly in front of the bar and (in most variations) the hips slightly higher than the knees.

 

Phil Gephart, MS, CSCS, is a certified personal trainer and owner of Newport Fit4Life in Newport Beach, Calif. A former professional basketball player, his CHEK & PICP certifications are recognized as the top in the world in the holistic, corrective exercise approach as well as preparing athletes for competition. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

No

Powered by WPeMatico

Dumbbell-Floor-Flye
Steve Smith / M+F Magazine

We have little doubt that you’ve done a set (or a hundred) of dumbbell flyes before and have probably heard of the floor press, too. Both are basic chest moves. The former is meant to stretch your muscle fibers and exhaust the pecs, while the latter move limits your range of motion so you can use heavier weight.

Well, trainer and owner of Iron House Designs, Jim Ryno, has gone ahead and combined the moves to bring you a unique variation of the flye—the one-arm floor chest flye.

You’ll be able to better focus on one side of your chest by doing the flye unilaterally, and lying on the floor will allow you to use a heavier bell for a greater muscular overload. (Also, it’ll spare your shoulder joint, since you won’t be able to extend the joint past the 90-degree mark, which can be dangerous.)

Give these a try with light weight before your workout to warm up your shoulders and chest, or end your training session with four sets of 10 reps each to finish off your chest.

How to Do the One-Arm Floor Chest Flye

  1. Lie down on the floor, legs bent and your feet on the floor, holding a dumbbell in one hand with the other arm extended out to your side.
  2. Extend the weighted arm up over your chest, then lower it down as you would during a dumbbell flye. Touch the back of your upper arm to the floor on every rep without letting it rest at the bottom.
  3. Maintain a slight bend in the elbow and keep the motion slow and controlled as you raise the dumbbell back up until it’s directly above your shoulder, arm straight.
No

Powered by WPeMatico

Plastic in a Recycling Bin
Cole Burston/Bloomberg / Getty

Bad news, clean eaters: You’ve all been cheating on your diets. Turns out, because lots of stuff is made out of plastic and recycling is just too damn hard to do, we’ve all been ingesting up to five grams of microplastics each week, according to the WWF (World Wildlife Fund). 

Scientists from the University of Newcastle in Australia reviewed 52 existing studies and estimated that through food, drinks, and even just breathing, we suck down about a credit card’s worth every seven days. The study listed water as the biggest offender, with a potential 1,769 plastic particles (in this particular case, microplastics under 1mm) coming from it per week. Shellfish, salt, and beer (ugh!) were also listed as main offenders. 

So what does sucking down a credit card’s worth of weekly microplastics—plastic particles under five millimeters in size—mean for our health stats? Though it’s not delicious and certainly not delicious, the jury is out regarding just how sick it’ll make us. In fact, the World Health Organization and the University of Newcastle in Australia are currently conducting studies to find out potential health impacts.

That being said, here’s some semi-good news: The scientists admitted that the study was built on a “limited set of evidence, and comes with limitations.” (Translation: they don’t really know if the number is five grams or not, but it’s in the ballpark.)

Now, here’s some more bad news: The report does note that microplastics can carry pollutants from the environment and contain toxins. So, the jury is still out either way.  

Point is, we hope you enjoy your dinner—with a side of fat-free microplastics, of course.

 

 

No

Powered by WPeMatico

When I wander into the kitchen for a snack these days, the questions running through my mind tend to be of the, “I wonder if that Greek yogurt I bought has turned,” variety. But, when you’re in a serious training cycle and you’re focusing on food as fuel that helps you perform at your highest level, your questions tend to get a little deeper. And those are just the questions being answered in the new Sports Nutrition Handbook by Justyna Mizera and Krzysztof Mizera. While the answers and explanations are backed with science, they’re explained in a straightforward manner that you…

The post 3 Common Sports Nutrition Questions, Answered appeared first on Fit Bottomed Girls.

Powered by WPeMatico