greek grilled veggies recipeWhen planning a BBQ menu, the meat is usually the star, and the sides are an afterthought. With this Grilled Greek Summer Veggies recipe, a platter overflowing with colorful marinated and grilled vegetables steals the show.

This is the perfect vegetable side dish for summer. It’s very no-fuss, keeps well in the refrigerator to eat throughout the week, and can feed a crowd.

Customizing Your Greek Grilled Veggies

You’ll find that this recipe adapts well to small tweaks to suit your tastes. Here are a few ways to make it your own:

  • Use your favorite veggies. Feel free to swap out vegetables and grill what you love.
  • Make them thicker if you’d like. We sliced each of these vegetables around ¼-?” thick so they will grill quickly, but you can slice them thicker if you like meatier veggies.
  • Switch up the dressing for fun. This dish would also be tasty with the Primal Kitchen Italian Dressing or Primal Kitchen Oil and Vinegar Dressing in lieu of the Greek dressing.
  • Stovetop option. If you don’t have a grill, these can be made in a grill pan on the stovetop, or even roasted on a parchment-covered sheet pan in your oven. Roast at 400 degrees for 15 minutes on each side, or until nicely browned.

Here’s how to make your new favorite BBQ side dish.

Grilled Greek Summer Vegetables Recipe

Time in the kitchen: 20 minutes

Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 medium eggplant, sliced into rounds
  • 1 medium zucchini, sliced
  • 1 yellow squash, sliced into rounds
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored and cut into thick slices
  • 1 small red onion, sliced into rounds
  • 8 oz. cremini mushrooms (you can cut them in half if you’d like)
  • ? cup Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing, divided
  • 2 Tbsp. Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil
  • 2 cloves grated garlic
  • Pinch of salt and pepper
  • Chopped parsley
  • Optional: chopped oregano, crumbled feta cheese

greek grilled veggies recipe

Directions

In a bowl, combine ¼ cup of Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing, Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Toss all of the vegetables in the sauce. Allow the vegetables to marinate for 30 minutes, tossing them once or twice during this time.

greek grilled veggies recipe

Preheat your grill over medium heat. Once hot, carefully place the vegetables on the grill. After 1-2 minutes, turn each of them 90 degrees to get nice grill marks.

greek grilled veggies recipeGrill for an additional 1-2 minutes, then flip over the vegetables and grill for an additional 2-3 minutes, or until they are nicely grilled on the outside and tender on the inside (this time will depend on how thick you slice them).

greek grilled veggies recipeDrizzle the remaining Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing on top and garnish with chopped parsley and feta if desired.

greek grilled veggies recipe

 

greek grilled veggies recipe

Nutrition Info (4 servings):

Calories: 222
Fat: 18g
Total Carbs: 14g
Net Carbs: 9g
Protein: 4g

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how to eat artichokes Artichokes are a mysterious vegetable, and a lot of people are intimidated by them. How do you cook an artichoke? How do you cut into it? What parts do you eat? And how does it taste?

You may have had marinated artichoke hearts that come in a jar, or you’ve noticed little strips of artichoke in your spinach dip. But eating a whole artichoke is a lot different than having prepared hearts.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to prepare and eat an artichoke, along with my favorite dipping sauces.

Are Artichokes Good For You?

Coming in at 6g of net carbs per whole artichoke, it’s something you’ll want to add to the rotation if you’re keto. Artichokes are also an antioxidant powerhouse, and they have lots of gut-happy resistant starch.

How to Buy Artichokes

If you’ve never bought whole artichokes before, you might wonder how to choose good ones. Here’s what to look for:

  • Tight leaves. Your artichoke should look like a giant flower bud. Leaves should not be curling out like a blooming flower.
  • Heft. Pick up a few, and feel their weight. Heavier artichokes are fresher, and lighter ones are older and perhaps dried out.
  • Brown streaks on the outside, or not. A little browning on the outside is nothing to be concerned about. Some people say that the ones with brown streaks are sweeter because the frost that caused them brings out the natural sugars.

Once your artichokes are cleaned and steamed properly, the leaves and heart are excellent vehicles for dips.

How to Cook an Artichoke (Steam Method)

Serves: 2-4

Time in the kitchen: 45 minutes, including 35 minutes steaming time

how to cook an artichoke

Ingredients

Directions

To prepare an artichoke, first cut off most of the stem on top, leaving about ¼” of the stem left intact.

how to cook an artichoke

Cut off the tough bottom of the artichoke, about 1” worth. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tough prickly ends of the artichoke leaves. Cut a lemon in half and rub the cut side all of the cut end of the artichoke.

Set up a steamer by filling a pot with some water and a squeeze of lemon. Once the water is boiling, set the heat so the water is at a steady simmer. Set up the steamer basket inside and place the artichokes in the basket cut side down.

Place the lid on and allow the artichokes to steam for around 30 minutes, 35 minutes if they’re quite large. You know they’re finished when you can put a knife through the center of the stem with little resistance.

Allow the artichokes to cool. Combine your favorite Primal Kitchen Mayo with a squeeze of lemon and fresh cracked pepper.

How to Eat an Artichoke

This part is easy. Once your artichoke is cooled, peel the leaves off of one by one, dip in the mayo, and enjoy!

how to eat artichokes

When you’re finished eating the leaves of the artichoke, it’s time to find and clean the heart. Pull off any remaining inner leaves (they’re usually in the shape of a little cone) to expose a fuzzy circle in the stem.

Scoop out those fuzzy pieces out with a spoon and you’ll be left with the artichoke heart, which is the base of the stem and artichoke. Slice it into a few pieces and dip it in the mayo. It’s the most tender, meaty part of the artichoke!

Nutrition Info (per one medium artichoke):

Calories: 60g
Fat: 0g
Total Carbs: 13g
Net Carbs: 6g
Protein: 4g

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homemade sauerkraut recipe

Although fermented cabbage has been around in some form or another since ancient times – Roman author Pliny the Elder wrote of the stuff in the first century A.D. – modern methods for making sauerkraut were developed sometime between the 16th and 18th centuries. It’s primarily known as a German staple, but most other European countries use it in their traditional dishes. It’s pretty easy to understand why it was so popular: it keeps for a long time without refrigeration. Dutch, German, and English sailors found that the vitamin C-rich kraut prevented scurvy on the open seas, and the fact that it was salted and fermented made it ideal for long voyages without other preservation methods.

As the name would suggest, sauerkraut is quite literally sour cabbage. The sour flavor comes from the process of lacto-fermentation, similar to the pickling of cucumbers. But instead of soaking the cabbage in a vinegary brine solution, sauerkraut preparation requires only salt and the lactic acid bacteria already present on raw cabbage.

Is sauerkraut good for you?

You may have heard before that sauerkraut, or fermented foods in general, have a number of health benefits and you should eat more of them. Here’s what we know.

Health Benefits of Sauerkraut

More than just a delicious, tangy flavor, the beauty of sauerkraut also lies in its considerable health benefits:

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Beauty isn’t everything and celery root is living proof. There’s nothing about its knobby, gnarled, beige appearance that would entice you to put it in your shopping cart. You’ve probably passed by it a hundred times nestled between the turnips and rutabagas, not even realizing what an amazing root vegetable you’re missing in your life.

The flavor of celery root strongly resembles celery, but there’s also something potato-like about it in both taste and texture. It’s often eaten as a salad, grated then left raw or quickly blanched and mixed with mayonnaise, lemon and mustard. This time of year we prefer to cook celery root a little longer before serving. Peeled and cut into pieces, this vegetable can be braised, boiled, baked or sautéed. If you’re tired of using cauliflower as a mashed potato stand-in, give mashed celery root a try.  Even better, gently simmer celery root, then puree it into a creamy soup.

Celery Root Soup is an incredibly easy recipe that can be doctored up into something a little fancier when you’re in the mood. The basic soup is simply shallots (or leeks) and regular celery sautéed in butter then simmered in broth or water with celery root for about 35 minutes. Puree the soup, then add whole cream (or coconut milk) to make the texture even silkier than it already is. Salt, pepper, add some chopped parsley and thyme, and you’re done.

Once you have this base, which is delicious as-is, the variations are endless. Add a little meat to the equation by frying bacon or pancetta in the pan with the shallot, or sprinkle crumbled bacon on top of the soup as a garnish when it’s done. Sauté mushrooms or spinach to add to the pot. Maybe grate a little Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese on top, or melt butter until it’s browned and has a sweet, nutty aroma and then drizzle it into your bowl.

You can make the soup with broth, bone broth or water. Water actually works quite well and lets the delicate flavor of the celery root shine through. Note: adding pureed celery root to other types of soup is a great way to make soup thick and creamy without adding dairy or potato.

So, next time you see this ugly but quite tasty vegetable at the store, go ahead and bring one home. It’s sometimes called celeriac, instead of celery root, and will most likely be displayed by the other root vegetables—not the celery. Celery root is a vegetable all on its own; it’s not actually the root of regular celery. The best way to attack celery root is with a paring knife, first cutting off the gnarled roots, then trimming off the skin.

Servings: 4

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 stick butter
  • 4 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped shallot (or 1 leek, sliced)
  • 2  pounds celery root, (about two large roots) peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 6 cups broth
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream or coconut milk
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 teaspoon chopped thyme

Instructions:


Over medium low heat, melt the butter in a deep pan. Add celery and shallot/leek and sauté until soft but not overly browned, about five minutes. Add celery root and sauté a few minutes more, then add 6 cups of broth or water and turn up heat slightly. Bring to a boil then turn the heat lower and simmer with a lid on for 35-40 minutes until the celery root is easily pierced with a fork.

Working in small batches (to reduce the odds of splattering hot liquid on yourself and all over your kitchen) puree the soup in a blender until very smooth. If you prefer soup with more texture, only puree half of the celery root and leave the rest in chunks. Return the blended soup to the pot and slowly stir in cream or coconut milk. Use the remaining 2 cups of broth or water to thin out the soup to your desired consistency. Add salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with parsley and thyme.

Nutritional Information (per serving with broth used):

  • Calories: 392
  • Total Carbs: 25.9 grams
  • Net Carbs: 20.7 grams
  • Fat: 27.65 grams
  • Protein: 12.72 grams

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Hearty salads have the best of all worlds: ample protein, copious vegetables, and big flavor. And when they’re seasonally inspired? All the better…

We’re loving this earthy autumn dish right now. Seared steak, fall vegetables and tangy mustard vinaigrette—together they make the perfect salad supper.

Servings: 3

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 90 minutes

Ingredients:

Salad:

  • 3 cups cubed Butternut Squash
  • 1 large Delicata Squash, seeds removed and sliced into rings (about 1.5-2 cups)
  • 1 head Cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 lb. Brussels Sprouts, halved
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped Fresh Rosemary
  • 4 cloves Garlic, grated
  • 3 cups chopped Lacinato Kale
  • 1/4 cup Primal Kitchen® Avocado Oil or Olive Oil
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 medium Apple, quartered and thinly sliced

Steak:

  • 1 lb. Tri-Tip Steak (but feel free to use another cut like sirloin, skirt, etc.)
  • 1 Tbsp. Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil
  • 1/2 Tbsp. Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 cloves Garlic, grated
  • Salt and Pepper

Dressing:

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Toss the butternut and delicata squash with 1.5 tablespoons of avocado oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Lay the squash pieces on a parchment covered sheet pan in a single layer. Roast for 20 minutes, flip the squash over and roast for an additional 20 minutes, or until the squash is nicely roasted.

Toss the brussels sprouts and cauliflower florets in 1.5 tablespoons of oil, rosemary, garlic, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Lay the brussels sprouts cut side down on a parchment covered sheet pan. Roast for 20 minutes, or until the underside of the Brussels sprouts are golden, then flip over and roast for an additional 10 minutes or until tender.

Massage the chopped kale in the last tablespoon of oil and a pinch of salt and arrange on a sheet pan. Roast for around 10-15 minutes.

Lay the cauliflower on another sheet pan and roast for 20 minutes. Give the florets a shake or flip and continue roasting until browned and tender.

Place a seasoned cast iron pan in the oven to preheat for 15-20 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the avocado oil, red wine vinegar, salt and pepper. Toss the steak in the mixture and allow it to marinate for about 10 minutes.

Once the pan is very hot, place it over a burner on medium heat. Add the steak and sear it for 1-2 minutes on each side. Transfer the pan to the oven and continue cooking until it reaches your desired internal temperature (125 degrees for rare, 135 degrees for medium-rare, 145 degrees for medium). Remove the steak from the pan and allow it to rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

To make the dressing, whisk all of the dressing ingredients together and add salt and pepper to taste.

Combine all of the roasted vegetables together in a large bowl. Top with the sliced steak and apple slices and drizzle on the dressing.

Nutrition Information per serving (¼ of recipe):

  • Calories: 618
  • Total Carbs: 48 grams
  • Net Carbs: 35 grams
  • Fat: 35 grams
  • Protein: 35 grams

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These days you can find a wide array of grain-free pastas with genuinely delicious flavor and texture. If you like the taste of pasta but want to limit the pasta carbs, add meat and veggies so less pasta goes further in the dish. Chicken thighs are a great choice to this end. Experiment with adding in veggies like spinach, baby broccoli, mushrooms or bell peppers, and create a variety of versions to your own taste.

For the sauce, use a full-fat coconut milk for the richest flavor, or use traditional full-fat dairy milk or your favorite milk substitute along with our new Primal Kitchen® No-Dairy Vodka Sauce.

Servings: 4

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 Tbsp. Primal Kitchen® Avocado Oil or Olive Oil, divided
  • 1 lb. Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs
  • 1.25 cups chopped Yellow Onion
  • 4 cloves Garlic, grated
  • ½ cup Full Fat Coconut Milk (or other dairy/non-dairy milk of choice)
  • 1.5 cups Primal Kitchen No-Dairy Vodka Sauce
  • 1 box Chickapea Penne Pasta
  • 2-4 Tbsp. Reserved Pasta Water
  • 2 Tbsp. Fresh Shredded Basil
  • Pinch of Red Pepper Flakes
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions:

Heat one tablespoon of oil in a pan over medium heat. Sprinkle the boneless chicken thighs with salt and pepper, and add them to the pan once it is hot. Sear for 2 minutes on each side, then cover the pan and reduce the heat to medium-low. Once the chicken reaches an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit, remove the thighs from the pan and allow them to rest for 5-10 minutes before slicing or cutting into chunks.

In the same pan (or another, whatever you prefer) add the remaining oil and heat it over medium heat. Once hot, add the chopped onion. Stir with a wooden spoon for 3-4 minutes, or until the onion is browned and soft. Add in the grated garlic and heat until the garlic is fragrant. Add in the Vodka Sauce and coconut milk and reduce the heat to medium low. Stir for 1-2 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened and come together.

Prepare the Chickapea pasta according to the directions on the box, but boil the pasta to be slightly undercooked. Drain the pasta, reserving about ¼ cup of pasta liquid. Pour the drained pasta into the pan with the vodka sauce and stir over medium-low heat until the pasta reaches your desired doneness. Add in the chicken and stir. Add the reserved pasta water 1 tablespoon at a time until the sauce reaches the thickness of your liking. Top the pasta with a pinch of red pepper flakes, a sprinkle of salt and pepper and the shredded basil. Enjoy!

Nutrition Information per serving (1/4 of recipe):

  • Calories: 547
  • Total Carbs: 50 grams
  • Net Carbs: 40 grams
  • Fat: 21 grams
  • Protein: 40 grams

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