how to eat artichokes Artichokes are a mysterious vegetable, and a lot of people are intimidated by them. How do you cook an artichoke? How do you cut into it? What parts do you eat? And how does it taste?

You may have had marinated artichoke hearts that come in a jar, or you’ve noticed little strips of artichoke in your spinach dip. But eating a whole artichoke is a lot different than having prepared hearts.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to prepare and eat an artichoke, along with my favorite dipping sauces.

Are Artichokes Good For You?

Coming in at 6g of net carbs per whole artichoke, it’s something you’ll want to add to the rotation if you’re keto. Artichokes are also an antioxidant powerhouse, and they have lots of gut-happy resistant starch.

How to Buy Artichokes

If you’ve never bought whole artichokes before, you might wonder how to choose good ones. Here’s what to look for:

  • Tight leaves. Your artichoke should look like a giant flower bud. Leaves should not be curling out like a blooming flower.
  • Heft. Pick up a few, and feel their weight. Heavier artichokes are fresher, and lighter ones are older and perhaps dried out.
  • Brown streaks on the outside, or not. A little browning on the outside is nothing to be concerned about. Some people say that the ones with brown streaks are sweeter because the frost that caused them brings out the natural sugars.

Once your artichokes are cleaned and steamed properly, the leaves and heart are excellent vehicles for dips.

How to Cook an Artichoke (Steam Method)

Serves: 2-4

Time in the kitchen: 45 minutes, including 35 minutes steaming time

how to cook an artichoke

Ingredients

Directions

To prepare an artichoke, first cut off most of the stem on top, leaving about ¼” of the stem left intact.

how to cook an artichoke

Cut off the tough bottom of the artichoke, about 1” worth. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tough prickly ends of the artichoke leaves. Cut a lemon in half and rub the cut side all of the cut end of the artichoke.

Set up a steamer by filling a pot with some water and a squeeze of lemon. Once the water is boiling, set the heat so the water is at a steady simmer. Set up the steamer basket inside and place the artichokes in the basket cut side down.

Place the lid on and allow the artichokes to steam for around 30 minutes, 35 minutes if they’re quite large. You know they’re finished when you can put a knife through the center of the stem with little resistance.

Allow the artichokes to cool. Combine your favorite Primal Kitchen Mayo with a squeeze of lemon and fresh cracked pepper.

How to Eat an Artichoke

This part is easy. Once your artichoke is cooled, peel the leaves off of one by one, dip in the mayo, and enjoy!

how to eat artichokes

When you’re finished eating the leaves of the artichoke, it’s time to find and clean the heart. Pull off any remaining inner leaves (they’re usually in the shape of a little cone) to expose a fuzzy circle in the stem.

Scoop out those fuzzy pieces out with a spoon and you’ll be left with the artichoke heart, which is the base of the stem and artichoke. Slice it into a few pieces and dip it in the mayo. It’s the most tender, meaty part of the artichoke!

Nutrition Info (per one medium artichoke):

Calories: 60g
Fat: 0g
Total Carbs: 13g
Net Carbs: 6g
Protein: 4g

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how to make pemmicanIf you’ve ever had a meat or jerky bar made of finely chopped dried meat and perhaps berries, you may be familiar with pemmican. Pemmican consists of lean, dried meat – usually beef nowadays, but bison, deer, and elk were common back in the day) which is crushed to a powder and mixed with an equal amount of hot, rendered fat, usually beef tallow. Sometimes crushed, dried berries are added as well. For long periods of time, people can subsist entirely on pemmican, drawing on the fat for energy and the protein for strength, and glucose, when needed.

Vihljamur Stefansson, eminent anthropologist and arctic explorer, went on three expeditions into the Alaskan tundra during the first quarter of the 20th century. His discoveries – including the “blond” Inuit and previously uncharted Arctic lands – brought him renown on the world stage. People were fascinated by his approach to travel and exploration, the way he thrust himself fully into the native Inuit cultures he encountered. Stefansson studied their language, adopted their ways, and ate the same food they ate. In fact, it was the diet of the Inuit – fish, marine mammals, and other animals, with almost no vegetables or carbohydrates – that most intrigued him. He noted that, though their diet would be considered nutritionally bereft by most “experts” (hey, nothing’s changed in a hundred years!), the Inuit seemed to be in excellent health, with strong teeth, bones, and muscles. He was particularly interested pemmican.

The Inuit, Stefansson noted, spent weeks away from camp with nothing but pemmican to eat and snow to drink to no ill effect. Stefansson, a Canadian of Icelandic origin, often accompanied them on these treks and also lived off of pemmican quite happily, so its sustaining powers weren’t due to some specific genetic adaptation unique to the Inuit. In fact, when Stefansson returned home, he and colleague adopted a meat-only diet for a year, interested in its long-term effects. A controlled examination of their experience confirmed that both men remained healthy throughout.

So, pemmican has a reputation as a sort of superfood. While I’m usually leery of such claims, the fact that the stuff is essentially pure fat and protein (plus Stefansson’s accounts) made me think that maybe there was something to it. I set out to make my own batch.

 

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How to Make Pemmican

What you need:

  • 1 1/2 lbs I got about a pound and a half of lean, grass-fed shoulder roast,
  • Salt and pepper
  • Fresh or frozen wild blueberries
  • Grass-fed bison or beef kidney fat, leaf fat, suet, or tallow

Let the meat firm up in the freezer, then slice it thin. After adding liberal amounts of salt and pepper, set the oven to the lowest possible temperature (around 150 degrees) and lay out the strips of meat directly onto a rack. Keep the oven door slightly open to prevent moisture buildup.

how to make pemmican dried bison

Put a handful of frozen wild blueberries on a small oven pan to dry out with the meat.

Let the meat dry out for about 15 hours, or until it takes on a crispy jerky characteristic that breaks apart easily. Pulverize the jerky in the food processor or blender until it becomes powder.

how to make pemmicanAfter the meat, repeat the process for the blueberries. No need to wash the blender in between – you’ll mix the dried meat and dried berries together anyway. Again, you want a powder. how to make pemmican

Now, render the fat. I used grass-fed bison kidney fat, which was already diced into tiny pieces. I put about half a pound of that into a cast iron pan and cooked it slowly over super-low heat.

how to make pemmican

I made sure to stir the fat as it rendered out, and watched closely so that it wouldn’t burn. When the fat stops bubbling, the rendering is done.

Use a strainer to avoid all the crispy bits; you just want the pure, liquid fat.

Mix the meat and berry powder together, then slowly add the hot liquid fat. Pour just enough so that the fat soaks into the powder.

how to make pemmican

If you poured in too much fat too quickly, you can add a bit of almond meal to firm it up. Once it firms, cut it into bars or roll it into balls.

how to make pemmican

Pemmican will keep almost forever. Pure, dried protein and rendered (mostly saturated) fat are highly stable, so I wouldn’t worry about it going rancid. If it does, you’ll know.

how to make pemmican

Now, my pemmican wasn’t exactly delicious. Without much spice, it comes out fairly bland. Maybe I’ll jazz it up next time with some more salt and spices, but I don’t think pemmican is meant to be eaten for pleasure. This is utilitarian food, perfect for long treks through the wilderness. It gets the job done, and I’ll probably make it again. It definitely doesn’t taste bad; in fact, the taste grows on you after awhile.

My dog certainly enjoyed cleaning up the bowl.

Has anyone else here tried pemmican? Let me know what you think!

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keto angel food cakeFor whatever reason, angel food cake seems to make its yearly debut during that time when warmer weather breaks. Is it the toppings – fresh berries, or a perfectly ripe peach? Is it those first rays of sunshine after a cold winter that make you want something pillowy soft and sweet? There could be a hundred reasons why angel food cake is a slice of spring on a plate.

Angel food cake may be something you considered a cheat, until now. Traditional angel food cake recipes call for a lot of sugar – since there’s no frosting, the cake has to be sweet on its own. This keto angel food cake recipe gives you all of the light, airy sweetness without the aftermath that comes with a sugary dessert.

And, it’s surprisingly easy to make. Proper whisking of the egg whites can be intimidating, but you won’t mess it up. The key is to stop whisking when you get “soft peaks.” You’ll know you’re there when you can make small rolling hills in your egg white mixture by slowly lifting your whisk out of the bowl.

Here’s how to do it.

Keto Angel Food Cake Recipe

Serves: 6

Time in the kitchen: 25 minutes, including 15 minutes bake time

keto angel food cake

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp. Lakanto powdered monkfruit 2:1 sweetener
  • 3 Tbsp. coconut flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 9 large egg whites
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3/4 tsp. cream of tartar
  • coconut whipped cream, chopped dark chocolate, or fresh berries (optional)

Directions

Prior to whisking up the egg whites, preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a 8” cake pan with parchment paper. Mix the almond flour, granulated monk fruit sweetener, coconut flour and a pinch of salt in a small bowl and set aside.

Crack the egg whites in a clean, dry mixing bowl. Whisk vigorously with a whisk or hand mixer until the mixture becomes very frothy.

keto angel food cake

Add the cream of tartar and vanilla extract and continue whisking vigorously. You want to continue whisking until the egg whites become just slightly stiff and form soft peaks when you lift up the whisk.

keto angel food cake

Once the egg whites look white, instead of clear, and you can make peaks on the surface with your whisk, carefully fold the dry ingredients into the egg whites with a flexible spatula, adding the dry ingredients a little at a time until the batter is mixed. Do this gently to prevent the egg whites from collapsing.

Quickly pour the batter into the lined round pan and place it into the oven. Bake for 15-17 minutes, or until the cake begins to brown on top and the center feels firm. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool.

Top your cake slices with dollops of coconut cream, chopped dark chocolate and fresh strawberries.

Tips For a Perfect Keto Angel Food Cake

  1. The whisked egg whites are delicate, so gently (but quickly) fold in the dry ingredients and place the cake pan in the oven ASAP so the cake can rise properly.
  2. The Lakanto powdered monkfruit brand sweetener is a bit sweeter than other brands, like Swerve confectioners sweetener. If you choose to swap Lakanto and instead use powdered Swerve, consider increasing the sweetener to ¼ cup + 3 Tbsp. up to ½ cup of powdered Swerve. You may find the amount in the recipe to be enough, depending on how sweet you like it. We prefer the Lakanto monkfruit sweetener since the aftertaste is barely noticeable.

keto angel food cake

Nutrition Information (? of cake, without toppings)

Calories: 100
Total Carbs: 4 grams
Net Carbs: 2 grams
Fat: 6 grams
Protein: 8 grams

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Keto Egg BakeEggs and bacon or eggs and sausage with black or collagen coffee are typical keto breakfasts, but this keto egg bake is a nutrient-dense and satiating option for weekend morning when you a bit more time. Weave it into your Sunday meal prep routine, bake it, cool it, portion it and wrap in parchment paper, and store it in the refrigerator. On busy weekday mornings, take a portion out of the fridge to warm up on the counter, or to heat for a few minutes in the oven or toaster oven. Re-wrap the portioned egg bake in the parchment paper, grab a napkin (don’t forget your travel coffee mug), and you have breakfast on the go.

Instead of the hash browns or bread cubes you might typically find in an egg bake or breakfast casserole, we used grated turnips, but you could also substitute grated parsnips, zucchini, or even carrots or sweet potatoes if you want a Primal egg bake. We used ground chicken, but you could also use ground turkey, beef, sausage, bison, or lamb. Same thing for the other vegetables—instead of kale and cabbage, you could use Swiss or rainbow chard, shredded Brussels sprouts, or baby spinach.

Keto Egg Bake

Servings: 6

Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

Keto Egg Bake

  • 2 ½ cups turnips (about 2-3 turnips), grated
  • 2 tablespoons Primal Kitchen Extra Virgin Olive Oil or Avocado Oil
  • 1 lb. ground meat of choice (we used ground chicken)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ cup shallots, diced
  • 3 cups greens of choice (we used a kale/cabbage slaw mix)
  • 2 tablespoons dill, chopped
  • 8 eggs

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 350ºF. Grate the turnips on a box grater. Press the grated turnip between two pieces of paper towel to remove any excess water, then measure the grated turnips to get 2 ½ cups worth.

Keto Egg Bake

Heat the oil in a pan over medium heat. Once hot, add the shallots and sauté for 2–3 minutes. Add the ground meat and break it up in the pan to encourage the meat to brown. As the meat cooks, season it with salt and pepper.

Keto Egg Bake

Once the meat is browned and cooked through, add in the turnips and sauté for 3–5 minutes, or until the turnips begin to soften. Add the greens and dill and stir until the greens are wilted. Season with salt to taste. Remove the pan from the heat and allow it to cool slightly.

Whisk the eggs in a bowl with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Pour the eggs in the pan with the meat until everything is combined. Pour the egg mixture into a greased or parchment-lined baking dish. Bake for 25–30 minutes, or until the center of the bake is firm and cooked through. Allow to slightly cool before cutting into 6 sections and serving.

Keto Egg Bake

Nutrition Information per serving (? of egg bake, assuming ground chicken is used):

Calories: 283
Total Carbs: 7 grams
Net Carbs: 4 grams
Fat: 19 grams
Protein: 24 grams

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2 ingredient keto snack chocolate baconFew words exist that can elicit an immediate mouth-watering response like these: dark chocolate and bacon. As simple as cooking can get (if that’s what we’re calling baking bacon, and melting chocolate), if you’re Primal, keto, or Primal-keto, you likely have these two ingredients on hand in your kitchen most of the time. Very dark chocolate (90%) has a bitterness akin to coffee that enhances all of the flavors paired with it, and the slightly sweet, salty, smoky flavor combination of the chocolate bacon tantalizes the tongue even more than our Dark Chocolate Macadamia Bark with Sea Salt. You can guild the lily by adding toasted unsweetened coconut or finely chopped nuts to the chocolate before it sets, but we prefer this as a twosome.

Servings: 10

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 10 oz. thick cut Applewood bacon (10 slices)
  • 3 oz. 90% dark chocolate, chopped

2 ingredient keto snack chocolate bacon

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Lay the bacon in a single layer on a parchment-covered sheet pan.

Bake until the bacon reaches the desired crispiness, then lay the bacon pieces on a paper towel to cool and soak up excess fat.

While the bacon is cooling, melt the chocolate over a double boiler: Heat a few inches of water in a small pot over medium or medium-low heat.

Once water begins to simmer, place a heat safe bowl over the top of the pot. Add the chopped chocolate and use a spatula to stir until it begins to melt. Stir until melted.

Pick up a slice of bacon and use a spoon to drizzle and spread out some of the chocolate over half of the slice of bacon.

Set the bacon on a parchment-covered plate or platter. Repeat with the remaining pieces of bacon. Once the chocolate has set, arrange the bacon on a platter or in a jar or container.

2 ingredient keto snack chocolate bacon

Nutrition Information per serving (1 piece of chocolate bacon):

Calories: 121
Total Carbs: 3 grams
Net Carbs: 2 grams
Fat: 12 grams
Protein: 3 grams

2 ingredient keto snack chocolate bacon

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These little fat bombs are the perfect treat and a great way to up the healthy fats in your diet while eating keto. We used Primal Kitchen® Peanut Butter Collagen here, but you can swap it out with vanilla or chocolate varieties. Store these fat bombs in the fridge or freezer to keep them firm. For a more chocolatey fat bomb, melt your favorite super dark or sugar-free chocolate and dip the tops of the chilled fat bombs in them. Dust with more Collagen Fuel and chill before enjoying.

Servings: 14

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Chill Time: 2-3 hours

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup butter or ghee
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 6 Tbsp. almond butter (we used Lux CBD Almond Butter)
  • 4 scoops Primal Kitchen Peanut Butter Collagen Fuel
  • 1/2 cup cacao powder
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp. finely ground coffee
  • pinch of salt
  • Super dark or sugar-free chocolate for topping (optional)

Instructions:

Melt the butter and coconut oil in a small saucepan.

Once melted, whisk in the almond butter. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and whisk in the collagen, cacao powder, vanilla extract, coffee and salt.

Pour the mixture into silicone molds of your choice.

We used 1 tablespoon of the chocolate mixture in each mold, which yielded about 14 squares. Refrigerate the molds for 2-3 hours or until firm. Store in the fridge.

Optional: If you’d like, melt a little of your favorite dark or sugar-free chocolate. Dip the tops of the fat bombs in the chocolate and flip them over. Dust some collagen over the top as well if you’d like.

Nutrition Information (with regular almond butter—1 tablespoon worth of fat bomb mixture, or 1/14 of recipe):

  • Calories: 148
  • Total Carbs: 5 grams
  • Net Carbs: 3 grams
  • Fat: 13 grams
  • Protein: 5 grams

Nutrition Information (with Lux CBD Almond Butter — 1 tablespoon worth of fat bomb mixture, or 1/14 of recipe):

  • Calories: 140
  • Total Carbs: 7 grams
  • Net Carbs: 4 grams
  • Fat: 11 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams

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In a perfect world, we’d all sit down every morning to a leisurely, healthy breakfast. In the real world, however, we’ve all done our share of eating breakfast in our cars, on the bus, or at our work stations Sometimes, where you eat the breakfast you grabbed on your way out the door can’t be helped. What can be helped, however, is what you eat. Keep in mind that while omelet muffins are perfect for breakfast on the go, they’d also be great for a weekend brunch. Double the recipe and make a dozen. Then, make time to sit down with family or friends and enjoy the type of long, leisurely breakfast that’s so hard to come by during the week.

The beauty of these omelet muffins? What you mix in for added flavor is up to you. Anything you love adding to an omelet—diced vegetables, meat, and some cheese if you’re so inclined—you can add to this recipe to create your own personal omelet muffin.

Servings: 12 muffins

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 10 Large Eggs
  • 6 oz. Bacon (Cooked)
  • 1 cup chopped Red Bell Pepper
  • 1/4 cup Shredded Cheese
  • 2 Tbsp. Coconut Milk or Cream
  • 2 Tbsp. Chopped Cilantro
  • Pinch of Black Pepper
  • Primal Kitchen® Avocado Oil Spray

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Arrange the bacon on a parchment covered sheet pan and bake for 20-30 minutes, until it reaches the doneness of your liking. Allow the bacon to cool and chop or crumble it into small pieces.

Whisk the eggs and coconut milk/cream together in a large bowl. Add in the chopped bacon, chopped bell pepper, cheese, cilantro and black pepper. Mix together until well combined.

Spray a set of 12 muffin tins with avocado oil spray. Ladle the egg mixture into each of the tins, about 2/3-3/4 of the way full. Bake for 18-20 minutes, or until they are slightly puffed up, yet firm to the touch. Remove from the oven. and allow them to cool slightly before removing them from the muffin tin. The egg muffins will deflate slightly as they are cooling.

Nutritional Information (per muffin):

  • Calories: 138
  • Total Carbs: 1 grams
  • Net Carbs: 1 grams
  • Fat: 11 grams
  • Protein: 11 grams

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Call them what you want – latkes, vegetables pancakes, fried-deliciousness. They’re traditionally made with potatoes, a food some of us Primals feel better avoiding. The tuber’s low-moisture and high-starch content creates a crispy exterior and fluffy interior when fried in oil. The high starch content, unfortunately, is also the reason the insulin resistant among us are better off turning to less starchy vegetables to satisfy latke cravings.

Although latkes made with vegetables like carrot, turnip, daikon radish and zucchini will never be quite as crispy as potato latkes, they’re darn good in their own right. The flavor of each vegetable is mild enough that you’ll still feel like you’re eating a latke, yet the latke is transformed into something new and interesting. Zucchini latkes are mildest of all, the carrot and turnip are slightly sweet, and the daikon version has just a hint of spiciness.

Notes: These latkes will work with many combinations of vegetables, especially root vegetables. To make the dish lower carb, you can swap out the sweet potato or carrot with turnips or rutabaga. Use multiple paper towels or a good hand towel to ring out moisture from the shredded vegetables, especially vegetables like daikon and zucchini. This will keep your latke batter from turning watery. To make the shredded vegetables either use the large holes on a box grater or food processor with a large grate attachment.

Servings: 3

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cooking Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup shredded daikon radish
  • 1 cup shredded zucchini
  • 1 cup shredded carrot
  • 1 cup shredded Japanese/white sweet potato
  • 1.5 scoops Primal Kitchen® Collagen Peptides
  • 2 Tbsp. almond flour
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. black pepper
  • 1 extra large egg or 2 medium eggs
  • ¼ cup Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 400 ºFahrenheit. Place a seasoned cast iron skillet in the oven to heat.

Use a towel to squeeze out the shredded vegetables. In a large bowl, combine the shredded vegetables, collagen, almond flour, garlic powder, salt, and black pepper. Crack the egg and mix it into the vegetable mixture. Allow the mixture to rest for 1 minute.

Place the skillet over medium high heat and add 2 tablespoons of oil. Once hot, add a scoop of the vegetable mixture to the skillet and gently flatten and shape it so it’s a slightly flattened patty. Repeat 2-3 more times so the skillet has 3-4 patties. Allow the latkes to fry for 1-2 minutes on each side.

Gently use a spatula to remove the latkes and place them on a parchment-covered sheet pan. Add the remaining oil and allow it to heat before repeating the above steps with the remaining vegetable mixture.

Place the sheet pan with the latkes on it in the oven for 10-12 minutes. Allow them to cool before removing them from the pan. Enjoy on their own or with your favorite sauce. We like combining Primal Kitchen Garlic Aioli Mayo with chopped parsley and lemon, but they are also great with a sour cream or yogurt-based dip.

Nutrition Information (per serving):

  • Calories: 268
  • Total Carbs: 15 grams
  • Net Carbs: 12 grams
  • Fat: 20 grams
  • Protein: 10 grams

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If you’re looking for a quick keto-friendly lunch, look no further. In less than ten minutes, you can throw together these tuna wraps using one of our favorite greens for all your wrap needs—collard green leaves. A bit of Primal-friendly mayo, some veggies, and a bit of fresh lemon juice give plenty of creamy flavor to this easy (and economical) meal you can grab and go with.

Check it out….

Collard Green Tuna Wraps

Servings: 12 wraps

Time In the Kitchen: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 collard leaves
  • 1 tin of tuna
  • 2 Tbsp. Primal Kitchen Mayo (your favorite flavor)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 squeezes fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup cucumber (cut into matchstick shape)
  • 1/4 cup shredded carrots
  • 1/8 cup radish (cut into matchstick shape)
  • 1/4 avocado (in slices)

Instructions:

Wash and dry collard leaves. Use a paring knife to cut the stems.

In a small bowl, combine tuna with mayo, salt and pepper, and lemon juice. Mix well.

Place collard leaves on a flat surface (1 large leaf per wrap). Top each leaf with tuna mixture and veggies, placing all ingredients on one end of the leaf.

Wrap up it up like you would a burrito—fold the leaf over top of the mixture and keep rolling, tucking both sides in as you roll. Cut the wrap in half. (You can use a toothpick to secure if desired.) Repeat the process with the other wrap. Enjoy!

Nutrition Information (1 wrap):

  • Calories: 244
  • Total Carbs: 5.7 grams
  • Net Carbs: 24.5 grams
  • Fat: 18 grams
  • Protein: 18 grams

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