As you get keto-adapted, most people find the inclination to snack (at least snack frequently) decreases. But that can take a bit of time. It’s not necessarily something to expect your first week (although some folks do begin to experience the change within a few days, provided they’re eating enough overall). Still, even the most long-term keto dieters will want a snack now and then—or will replace a meal with a snack because they’ve settled into a solid keto nutritional strategy and don’t always need three regular “meals” most days.

My theory is that meals, and particularly snacks, should be simple and easy. Few of us have time to make elaborate meals every day, and when we’re living into a new eating strategy, convenience matters. In that spirit, here are 20 keto snack ideas that take 5 minutes or less to make. Enjoy! And let me know your favorite—from this list or from your own keto or Primal practice.

1. Egg Coffee

An original Primal favorite is a great keto pick-me-up for morning or afternoon. Find the recipe here.

2. Soft- or Hard-boiled Egg

It doesn’t get much easier than this. Cook up a batch on Sunday, and you’ll be set for the week.

3. Guacamole

Make it as simple as you like. Mashed avocado, sea salt and lime juice do it for me, but sometimes I’ll throw in some canned green chilis, half a tomato, and some chopped red onion, garlic or cilantro.

4. Primal Kitchen® Protein Bar

I wanted a packaged keto snack to travel with, and these have become my favorite. (This variety has nine grams of total carbs.)

5. Tuna in Avocado Half

The fat of the avocado and Primal Kitchen Mayo with the protein of tuna make this one of the more filling snacks I turn to.

6. Olives

It’s the simple things, right? Splurge on a container of your favorite olive mix.

7. Spoonful of Artisana Coconut Butter

Just when I said it didn’t get any simpler… As I’ve shared before, this is one of my favorite go-to snacks.

8. Raw Veggies and Healthy Dip/Dressing

Anyone can put this together in containers for the week. And, yup, Primal Kitchen Dressings make it easier and more flavorful.

9. Leftover Chicken Wings

Savvy keto strategy: make enough wings for the play-off games on Sunday. Enjoy the leftovers during the week. Deep fry them in avocado oil (trust me on this…) and slather on your favorite BBQ sauce.

10. 5-Minute Salad

As most of you know, I’m a big fan of Big-Ass Salads for lunch, but a lighter (and quicker) snack salad is always a possibility. An easy one to put together is spinach, pecans, red onions, feta and Primal Kitchen Balsamic Dressing.

11. Leftover Steak Strips with Bell Pepper Strips and Steak Sauce

It’s a leftover lovers dream. And I’m happy to recommend a favorite steak sauce….

12. Lox Wraps

Skip the bagel carb binge and enjoy this classic on some butter lettuce or romaine leaves with a schmear of whipped cream and your favorite toppings.

13. Prosciutto-Wrapped Asparagus

Save some asparagus from dinner and take ten seconds to wrap them with this deli counter favorite.

14. Macadamia Nuts

Keep a bag of them at work. They’re great with your morning coffee, too.

15. Unsweetened Nut Butter on Celery Sticks

Make enough for the kids because otherwise they’ll eat yours.

16. Cheese Crisps

Yup—five minutes or less. Buy pure cheese crisps at the store (sometimes they’ll contain nut flour), or make them at home.

17. Summer Sausage

Your childhood camping favorite is still a good option. (Look for a nitrate-free brand.)

18. California Sub Roll-Up

I like this easy roll-up idea. Works for Italian sub ingredients, too.

19. Shrimp Cocktail

Keto can be as indulgent as you want to make it. I like making my own cocktail sauce with Primal Kitchen Organic Unsweetened Ketchup.

20. Square of 85% Dark Chocolate With Unsweetened Nut Butter

You didn’t think I’d leave out the dark chocolate, did you? Perfect with an afternoon coffee or as an after-dinner keto treat…

So, tell me what I missed! What are your favorite keto-friendly go-tos? Thanks for stopping in, everybody.

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The post 20 Keto Snacks (All Under 5 Minutes) appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Eggs are an easy and nutritious breakfast, but some mornings a plate of eggs just isn’t what your body craves. Viva variety!

These delicious keto breakfasts are either egg-free or include eggs as a minor ingredient. From keto pancakes, muffins and hot cereal to breakfast sausage and keto pizza, keto breakfasts have never tasted so good.

Bacon Pancakes

These savory bacon pancakes are served with a dollop of sour cream, a sprinkle of chives and a hit of hot sauce. Fluffy and salty, they’re a perfect breakfast for weekends.

Nutritional Info: (2 servings—3 pancakes per serving) Total fat: 21.1 g | Net carbs: 3.4 g | Protein: 19.2 g

Blueberry Keto Muffins

These truly delicious Keto blueberry muffins are a treat worth getting out of bed for. Plenty of butter and cream give these gluten-free, low carb muffins a decadently rich texture.

Nutritional Info: (1 muffin) Total fat: 27.7 g | Net carbs: 5 g | Protein: 7.8 g

Golden Coconut Collagen Latte

A warm and soothing start to the morning, this protein-packed latte combines the nourishing benefits of both turmeric and Primal Kitchen® Collagen Fuel.

Nutritional Info: (1 Serving) Total fat: 5.1 g | Net carbs: 2.4 g | Protein: 11.4 g

Primal Keto Bread

Toasted Primal keto bread is a buttery slice of heaven. Go sweet with the cinnamon version of Primal keto bread, or savory with a garlic and herb version.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 18.9 g | Net carbs: 2.4 g | Protein: 8.2 g

Homemade Breakfast Sausage

Homemade sausage is sugar and additive free, and for convenience can be made ahead of time and frozen. These flavorful patties are filling on their own and don’t have to be served on a plate with eggs.

Nutritional Info: (1 sausage?) Total fat: 24.2 g | Net carbs: 0 g | Protein: 30.7 g

Summer Breakfast Meatloaf

Meatloaf is an easy breakfast to make ahead of time, and then slice each morning for a protein-rich satisfying start to the day.

Nutritional Info: (1 sausage?) Total fat: 40.9 g | Net carbs: 3.3 g | Protein: 32.7 g

Greek Meatza

Before cauliflower pizza crust, there was meatza. This recipe deserves to be brought back from the past because it’s so darn good, and because it makes pizza for breakfast a keto reality. Serve Greek meatza for dinner then enjoy cold slice of pizza (or, “meatza”) for breakfast the next day.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 25.7 g | Net carbs: 4.3 g | Protein: 31 g

Pizza Dutch Baby

Another pizza-for-breakfast option, this keto pizza Dutch baby is light and fluffy and flavored with Parmesan, mozzarella and fresh basil.

Nutritional Info: (1 slice) Total fat: 25.7 g | Net carbs: 4.3 g | Protein: 31 g

Chia Flax Hot Pudding

This warm bowl of healthy goodness serves up enough protein, fat and fiber to satisfy until lunch. Optional topping like pecans and fresh berries give this healthy breakfast pudding a dessert-like flavor.

Nutritional Info: 1 serving Total fat: 35.7 g | Net carbs: 7.6 g | Protein: 22.3g

Keto Porridge

If you’re craving oatmeal or hot cereal, this keto porridge is what your body really wants. Made with richly flavorful ingredients like almond butter and coconut, this anti-inflammatory porridge also contains bee pollen, turmeric and hemp seeds.

Nutritional Info: 2 servings Total fat: 50.2 g | Net carbs: 6 g | Protein: 14.8 g

Blueberry Muffin Smoothie

No time to make blueberry muffins? Then try a satiating blueberry muffin smoothie made with healthy Primal Kitchen® Collagen Fuel.

Nutritional Info: 1 Serving Total fat: 31.4 g | Net carbs: 12 g | Protein: 23 g

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Putting dinner on the table just got easier with this meal prep plan that bangs out three dinners at once. All the mix-and-match ingredients you need for three different meals are cooked on single sheet pans, making cleanup easy, too.

The cooked ingredients are simply seasoned with salt and pepper for maximum versatility. Add more varied flavors when you dish up by incorporating the suggested herbs, spices, dressings, and garnishes.

Each meal provides 4 servings. The food can be served at room temperature, reheated in a microwave, or reheated by sautéing the ingredients briefly in a pan with oil.

Primal Sheet Pan Dinners Menu

  • Chicken Fajita Bowl
  • Steak & Broccoli “Stir-fry”
  • Greek Chicken Plate

This menu is only a guide. Feel free to mix and match the ingredients with your tastes in mind.

Primal Sheet Pan Dinners Shopping List

Tools

  • 3 half-size rimmed sheet pans (13”x18”)
  • Parchment paper or foil (for easier cleanup)
  • Spatula, for mixing ingredients while they cook
  • Food storage containers

Make-Ahead Ingredients

  • Avocado oil or extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 8 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (This equals 1 chicken thigh per person/per meal. Add a few more chicken thighs for bigger appetites)
  • 1 ½ to 2 pounds steak, about 1 inch thick (try flank steak, top sirloin steak, or strip steak)
  • 1 pound small potatoes (about 2 inch-diameter) if desired
  • 2 delicata squash
  • 3 bell peppers
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 large bunch broccoli
  • 8 ounces cherry tomatoes

Fresh Foods, Garnishes & Flavor Enhancers

  • Cumin
  • Chili powder
  • 1 bunch green onion
  • 1 head of garlic
  • 2 inches ginger root
  • 2 avocados
  • 2 5-ounce bags of baby spinach
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro
  • 2 bunches fresh Greek herbs (choose from dill, parsley, mint, or oregano)
  • 1 lime
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 container salsa
  • Toasted Nori or SeaSnax
  • 1 jar kalamata olives
  • 1 bag frozen cauliflower rice

Optional Enhancements From Our Own Primal Kitchen® Recipes and Products

Primal Sheet Pan Dinner Plan

Time: Approximately 90 minutes

Heat oven to 425 ºF/218 ºC

Cover sheet pans with parchment paper or foil (optional). IMPORTANT NOTE: Parchment paper cannot go under a broiler. Do not use parchment paper under the steak when broiling.

Sheet Pan #1

Cut the small potatoes into ½-inch-thick rounds. Spread the potatoes out on a sheet pan. Lightly coat the potatoes with avocado oil.

Pat chicken thighs dry with paper towels. Arrange chicken thighs, skin side up, on the sheet pan with the potatoes. Set aside.

Sheet Pan #2

Cut the delicata squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds, peel the red onion and cut in half, stem and seed the bell peppers. Cut all vegetables into 1/2-inch slices.

Spread the vegetables out on a sheet pan. Lightly coat with avocado oil. Set aside.

Sheet Pan #3

Cut the broccoli into florets. Spread broccoli florets out across one side of a sheet pan. Spread the cherry tomatoes out on the other side of the pan. Lightly coat everything with avocado oil. Set aside.

And finally…pat the steak dry with paper towels. Season generously with salt. Set aside on a plate.

Cooking Instructions

Season the ingredients on all three of the sheet pans with salt and pepper.

Put all three of the sheet pans in the oven. Set the timer for 20 minutes. Gently mix and toss the vegetables once or twice while they cook.

After 20 minutes, remove the squash, onion, bell peppers, broccoli, and tomatoes from the oven. (If the vegetables aren’t cooked enough for your preference, they can stay in the oven a bit longer.)

Set the timer for 10 minutes, and continue to cook the chicken thighs 10 minutes more until the skin is browned and chicken is cooked through (165 °F).

While the chicken finishes cooking, scrape the vegetables off one of the sheet pans into a food storage container. Set the steak on this sheet pan. (NOTE: Parchment paper cannot go under a broiler. Remove parchment paper before broiling the steak.)

When the timer goes off, remove the chicken from the oven. Turn the broiler on to high.

Place the sheet pan with the steak on the top rack under the broiler. Broil the steak, flipping once, until the meat registers 135°F (medium-rare) and the meat is charred on the edges, about 4 to 5 minutes a side. Let the cooked steak rest outside the oven for 10 minutes before slicing it thinly against the grain.

Set food storage containers out on the counter. Separate the chicken and steak into containers. Store the potatoes in one container. Store the delicata squash, onion, and bell peppers in another container. Store the broccoli in one container and the tomatoes in another. All of these cooked ingredients will stay fresh in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days.

 

Assembling the Meals

When you’re ready to eat, take out the containers and assemble a meal. You can assemble the ingredients into meals any way you like, but here are three ideas:

Meal #1: Chicken Fajita Bowls

Shredded chicken with roasted delicata squash, red onion, and bell peppers, plus avocado, green onion, salsa, cilantro, and a squeeze of lime

Shred the meat of four chicken thighs. Toss the meat with ¼ teaspoon cumin and chili powder. In each bowl, combine shredded chicken with half of the delicata squash, red onion, and roasted bell peppers.

Add garnishes: sliced avocado, green onion, salsa, cilantro, squeeze of lime

Add extra flavor: Thin Primal Kitchen Chipotle Lime Mayo with a few squeezes of lime juice until it has a slightly thinner consistency. Drizzle mayo on top.

Nutritional Information (per serving):

  • Calories—448
  • Net Carbs—17
  • Fat—26
  • Protein—28

Meal #2: Beef & Broccoli “Stir-fry”

Steak and broccoli over ginger and garlic cauliflower rice, garnished with green onions, toasted nori, and coconut aminos

In a saucepan, sauté a few finely chopped garlic cloves and a 2-inch piece of ginger root (peeled and cut into thin strips) in avocado oil until fragrant and lightly browned, 1 to 2 minutes.

Heat cauliflower rice according to package directions. Mix the garlic and ginger into the cauliflower rice, and portion into bowls. Top the cauliflower rice with sliced steak and broccoli.

Add garnishes: green onion, toasted nori (or Seasnax)

Add extra flavor: Drizzle coconut aminos on top

Nutritional Information:

  • Calories—360
  • Net Carbs—43
  • Fat—8
  • Protein—57

Meal #3 Greek Chicken

Chicken thighs with roasted potatoes, tomatoes, delicata squash, red onion, bell peppers, and sautéed garlic spinach with kalamata olives, fresh herbs, and a squeeze of lemon

On a plate, serve whole chicken thighs with the roasted potatoes, tomatoes, and leftover delicata squash, red onion, and bell peppers. Saute the bags of baby spinach in extra virgin olive oil with several cloves of minced garlic until the spinach wilts. Add spinach to the plates.

Add garnishes: chopped fresh parsley, dill, oregano, and/or mint, Kalamata olives, squeeze of lemon

Add extra flavor: Drizzle Primal Kitchen Greek Vinaigrette on top

Nutritional Information (without dressing):

  • Calories—465
  • Net Carb—34
  • Fat—22
  • Protein—26

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The post Sheet Pan Dinners: Three Meals In 90 Minutes appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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(This post is an update to an earlier post version.)

A Big-Ass Salad, as you know, is a perfect main meal of the day. However, with a little creativity there’s no limit to how (or when) you can enjoy your favorite combination of vegetables, greens and more. While Primal Kitchen® now offers a literal rainbow of 11 ready-made dressings and marinades that are all natural, whole-food, and fully Primal choices (including vegan and Whole30®-approved options), there’s always room for DIY creativity to fit your favorite salad varieties. Check out these 10 Primal-worthy ideas—and share your own in the comment section. Enjoy!

1. Raspberry Vinaigrette

This salad dressing is a summer classic. It’s tasty and refreshing—especially when paired with a salad of mixed baby greens, feta cheese and toasted walnuts.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of fresh or frozen (defrosted) raspberries
  • 1/3 cup of Primal Kitchen® Extra Virgin Avocado Oil
  • 2 Tbsp white wine
  • 1/2 packet of stevia or monkfruit (or equivalent of other natural, low-carb sweetener)
  • 1 Tbsp fresh mint leaves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon of sea salt
  • Black pepper, to taste

Method:

Finely chop mint leaves or shred in food processor. Set aside.

Puree fresh or defrosted raspberries in food processor until smooth. Pour into a mason jar or other container with a tight lid.

Mix raspberry puree with extra virgin avocado oil and white wine. Add sea salt, black pepper, sweetener and shredded mint leaves. Close the jar or container tightly, and shake to combine.

Serve immediately over salad and enjoy!

2. Citrus Vinaigrette

Liven up a regular salad with this crisp and refreshing summer-inspired salad dressing.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup Primal Kitchen Extra Virgin Avocado Oil
  • 1 Tbsp fresh squeezed orange juice
  • 1 Tbsp fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp chopped walnuts
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method:
Again, in a large mason jar or container with a tight lid, combine the orange juice, grapefruit juice, lime juice, and lemon juice. Drizzle in the avocado oil while whisking vigorously with fork. Once mixed, add the walnuts and stir. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

3. Dill Vinaigrette

This salad dressing is so tasty, you’ll want to double the recipe so that you can have it again when dinner time rolls around!

Ingredients:

Method:
In a blender or food processor (low setting), combine the oil, vinegar, dill weed, onion powder, garlic powder, and dry mustard. Blend until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.

4. Balsamic Vinaigrette

Although this makes a great, simple salad dressing, it’s equally delicious as a marinade for meat or drizzle on steamed vegetables.

Ingredients:

Method:
In a mason jar or other container with a tight lid, combine all the ingredients. Shake until all ingredients are combined. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

5. Basil Vinaigrette

Delicious year round, this salad is especially tasty when paired with an Italian-themed salad laden with fresh mozzarella and ripe tomatoes.

Ingredients:

Method:
In a bowl, whisk together the avocado oil, wine or vinegar, basil, and garlic. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

6. Parsley Dressing

Try this flavorful dressing on a salad of mixed greens or other mild-flavored salad combination.

Ingredients:

Method:
In a bowl, combine the avocado oil, lemon juice and onion powder. Once combined, add in the chopped parsley, mix thoroughly with a whisk and serve.

7. Lemon Caesar Dressing

Try this citrus-infused spin on the popular salad dressing option.

Ingredients:

Method:
In a bowl, whisk all ingredients except oil and sour cream. Once combined, slowly add oil, whisking constantly until smooth (if you stop, the dressing could break). Once combined, whisk in sour cream until smooth and creamy. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

8. Asian Dressing

Add a taste of the orient (without the added sugar) with this tangy Asian-inspired dressing.

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup Primal Kitchen Extra Virgin Avocado Oil
  • 3 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 Tbsp white vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp sesame seeds
  • 2 tsp Asian mustard (should be easily found in the ethnic food aisle of your local grocery store)
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 medium garlic cloves, minced

Method:
In a bowl, whisk together orange juice, vinegar, sesame seeds, mustard, sugar, salt, and garlic. Once combined, slowly whisk in sesame oil.

9. Ginger-Asian Dressing

A second spin on the Asian dressing theme, this dressing is delicious on salads as well as steamed or grilled veggies.

Ingredients:

  • 1 carrot, fresh, peeled and finely shredded
  • 1/2 cup Primal Kitchen Extra Virgin Avocado Oil
  • 1 Tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp coconut aminos
  • 2 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp minced onion
  • 1 tsp hot mustard
  • 1/2 tsp fresh ginger root, grated

Method:
Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor. Blend until smooth.

10. French Style Dressing

Looking for a way to get the kids to eat their greens? This tasty recipe is sure to wow them.

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup Primal Kitchen Extra Virgin Avocado Oil
  • 2 Tbsp red or white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp unsalted tomato paste
  • 2 tsp water
  • 1/2 tsp fresh minced onion
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground white pepper

Method:
In a large mason jar or other container with a tight lid, combine all ingredients, shake it up and serve.

Thanks for stopping in today, everyone. Which dressing looks like something you’d try? Any DIY recipes you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you on the comment board. Have a great end to the week.

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Today’s post is served up by the folks at PaleoHacks.com. Thanks to their team for the awesome recipe ideas. Hope you all enjoy!

Get ready to drink your way to health with this nutritious Protein Shake Roundup!

Smoothies and shakes can get a bad rap for spiking your blood sugar—especially ones with artificial sweeteners. But with the addition of protein from a healthy source—like collagen peptides or protein powderssmoothies and shakes can make a great snack or meal replacement.

These guilt-free smoothies and shakes are made only with wholesome ingredients and natural sweeteners—no dairy or processed sugars here! You’ll be surprised at how some of these healthy shakes and smoothies drink just like dessert.

Keep this list handy to help you find top-notch recipes that’ll energize you throughout the day!

#1 Amazing Paleo | Dark Chocolate Smoothie with Collagen Peptides
Yes, even chocolate shakes can be healthy! Banana, cacao powder, nut butter, coconut milk, honey and vanilla combine with two scoops of collagen peptides for one decadently-rich smoothie.

#2 Further Food | Vanilla Chai Collagen Protein Smoothie
Skip the chai tea latte and opt for this blended protein smoothie. It’s spiced with cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves!

#3 KetoDiet Blog | Creamy Keto Cinnamon Smoothie
When it comes to the protein in this creamy smoothie, you’ve got options! Choose from your favorite protein powder or go for a few scoops of collagen, then blend up with coconut milk, coconut oil, cinnamon, and chia seeds for even more protein.

 

#4 Autoimmune Wellness | Collagen-Berry Green Smoothie
This protein-packed smoothie is the perfect on-the-go meal for those following the autoimmune protocol. It helps balance blood sugar by blending collagen with healthy fat!

#5 Healing Family Eats | Maple Pumpkin Collagen Shake
Channel those fall vibes with this protein shake packed with pumpkin, banana, fresh oranges and cinnamon.

#6 Butter Nutrition | Real Food Protein Shake
This sweet strawberry shake nixes over-processed protein powders in favor of simple sources like collagen and pastured-raised egg yolks.

#7 Cook Eat Paleo | Espresso Protein Shake
This high-protein shake is almost like breakfast in a glass. Espresso or strong coffee blends up with cashew milk, bananas and ice for a creamy treat better than anything you can find at the Starbucks drive-thru.

#8 Wicked Spatula | Brownie Batter Protein Shake
This protein shake is like eating brownie batter off a spoon, but way healthier. Dark cocoa powder adds rich chocolatey flavor while collagen peptides boost its nutritional value.

#9 It’s a Mom’s World | Almond Joy Protein Shake
Get your candy fix with this nourishing chocolate, almond, and coconut-packed protein shake. It’s full of healthy fats to give you some serious staying power.

#10 PaleoHacks | Caramel Protein Smoothie
Dates substitute for rich caramel in this sweet protein smoothie. If you’re looking for a bigger energy boost, try adding maca powder to the mix.

#11 Love and Zest | Coconut Cream Pie Protein Shake
Dessert for breakfast? Yes, please! This shake is dense with coconutty flavor, while protein powder rounds everything out for the perfect meal replacement.

#12 The Kitchen Prep | Samoa Cookie Protein Shake
If you’re a cookie fiend, this protein shake is for you. It’s made with coconut flakes, Paleo caramel, and dairy-free chocolate chips to remind you of your favorite Girl Scout treat!

#13 Appetite for Energy | Raspberry Keto Protein Shake
Raspberries make for a sweet and tangy shake that mixes perfectly with coconut cream, but feel free to use any combination of berries you like!

#14 Low Carb Alpha | Almond Vanilla Protein Shake
This almond vanilla shake is full of staple pantry ingredients, so it’s extra easy to whip up on a dime.

#15 Against All Grain | Chocolate Paleo Protein Shake
Cashew milk makes for an ultra-creamy base to this simple and nourishing recipe chocolate protein shake.

Thanks again to PaleoHacks for their post today. Do you have favorite smoothie recipes? Share them below, and have a great week, everyone.

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As we move toward September, we might be thinking of Labor Day parties or fall tailgating weekends—events perfect for a barbecue spread. But when you’re eating Primal, keto or otherwise low-carb, traditional barbecue fare isn’t always the ideal choice. Even when you’re throwing a party centered on grilled meat, it’s all too easy for carbs to sneak into the mix. Buns, pasta salads, chips, cheese and crackers, beer, sweet tea, sodas and desserts often make up the bulk of a typical buffet. So, what’s a Primal type to do (or serve)? Here’s how to throw a low-carb barbecue feast everyone will love.

Drinks

Avoid high sugar drinks like juice, soda and tonic, and keep the ice chest filled with refreshing, sugar-free or low-sugar beverages.

Appetizers

Skip the chip and cracker aisle when shopping for a low-carb barbecue party. Instead, serve platters of cheese and nuts, raw vegetables with dip, and protein-rich appetizers.

Spicy Chorizo Keto Stuffed Jalapeños
Marinated Olives and Nuts 
Chipotle Lime Avocado Bacon Dip
Almost Deviled Eggs
Bacon Wrapped Hot Dog Bites

Side Dishes

Side dishes at a barbecue can be carb-loaded landmines. Instead of standard barbecue fare like pasta salad, potato salad, fruit salad and corn, load up the buffet up with crunchy coleslaw, colorful green salads and grilled or roasted vegetables.

Don’t ruin healthy low-carb salads with salad dressing or mayonnaise made from unhealthy industrial seed oils and sugar. Instead, whisk together homemade salad dressings. Better yet, make low-carb life easier by keeping Primal Kitchen® dressings and marinades and Mayo varieties on hand.

Keto Cole Slaw
Sausage and Veggie Skewers
Roasted Vegetable Salad
Baby Kale Rainbow Salad
Grilled Kale
Sesame Ginger Slaw

Meats

The most obvious way to avoid carbs at a barbecue is to serve hamburgers and sausages without buns. Even better, serve grilled meat that doesn’t need a bun, like steak, ribs or pork roast.

But beware of carbs lurking in the rubs, marinades and sauces that flavor meat. Sugar is usually the culprit. Read labels to avoid store bought rubs and marinades with sweeteners, or make your own rubs and marinades at home (or use any of the Primal Kitchen® Marinades).

Lime and Basil Marinaded Beef Kebabs
Low Carb BBQ Ribs
Coconut Marinated Short Ribs
Charcoal Roasted Pork Loin
5 Steps to the Perfect Steak

Condiments

Just try hosting a barbecue without ketchup, and wait for the outcry. Luckily, now there’s Primal Kitchen® Unsweetened Ketchup, Spicy Brown Mustard and Mayo to the rescue. Condiments that pack tons of flavor with very few carbs, like pickles, sauerkraut, and hot sauce, are also a must.

Desserts

A bowl of brightly colored berries (perhaps with unsweetened whipped cream on the side?) is an easy summer treat. If you’re willing to put in a little more work, then serve a decadent low-carb dessert.

Keto Coffee Popsicles
Keto Cheesecake Parfait
Avocado Matcha Dairy Free Ice Cream

Feeling inspired yet? Share your favorite barbecue fare below.

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The post How to Throw a Low-Carb Barbecue Party—With 20 Recipes appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Eating well means different things to different people, but I think we can agree that it should always taste good. The recipes that follow happen to be aligned with Whole30® eating guidelines—but more importantly, they’re all meals and snacks I would eat anytime. If you’re planning your first Whole30 or you’re new to the Primal or keto styles of eating, the recipes below offer a variety of easy, flavorful options for you and your family. No sacrifices necessary.

Whole30 Breakfast Recipes

Curried Pork Frittata

This curried pork frittata is a high-protein and high-fat meal that’s perfect for brunch or dinner. It’s a frittata, basically, with added flavor from coconut milk, ground pork, curry powder, and fresh arugula. The texture is light and airy, and the flavor is rich and buttery.

Servings: 4–6
Time: 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground pork (450 g)
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder, divided (10 ml)
  • 6 eggs
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled to room temp (85 g)
  • 3/4 cup coconut milk (180 ml)
  • ½ teaspoon salt (2.5 ml)
  • 2 large handfuls arugula

Learn how to make this recipe.

Whole30 breakfast sausage

Whole30-Approved Breakfast Sausage

Finding breakfast sausage without sugar and other additives is not the easiest task. Thankfully, with a few simple spices, making your own Whole30 homemade breakfast sausage for skillets, egg bakes, or sausage patties is really easy! This simple but tasty recipe from our dear friend Paleo Bailey at the Whole Kitchen Sink proves that you can make your own breakfast sausage in 30 minutes with minimal ingredients.

Servings: 8
Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ground pork
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon fennel
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Optional: 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Learn how to make the recipe.

Spanish Egg

Spanish Fried Egg

Need something to accompany that Whole30 breakfast sausage? Why, a fried egg, of course. While this crispy-edged egg can stand alone, it’s also wonderful with a side of homemade sausage or as a topper for a kale salad, zoodles, or sweet potato toast.

Servings: 1
Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, or enough to have about 1/8” in the bottom of the skillet
  • Salt

Learn how to make this recipe.

keto collagen smoothie

Keto and Whole30 Collagen Cacao Smoothie

One of the quickest and easiest ways to ensure you’re getting the nutrition you need is to make smoothies. Easily digestible and simple to make, this recipe takes the guesswork out of pre- and post-workout meals as well as breakfast. This smoothie has a slight chocolate almond flavor and is packed with healthy fats.

Servings: 1
Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1–1¼ cups full-fat coconut milk
  • ½ frozen avocado
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 2 tablespoons cacao powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon chia seeds, (soak in 2 tablespoons of water for 10 min)
  • 2 scoops Primal Kitchen Collagen Peptides
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • ½ cup ice
  • Optional toppings: cacao nibs, cinnamon, raspberries
  • ¼ cup water, if needed

Learn how to make the recipe.

Whole30 Lunch Recipes

Grilled Chicken Salad

Throw this Whole30 approved, keto-friendly, high-nutrient salad together in less than 10 minutes. If you plan to take it to work or to use as a make-ahead dinner, try stacking it in a large mason jar: Place the greens on the bottom, followed by the chicken, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, bacon, and seeds, and seasonings. Right before you’re ready to eat, shake onto a plate or salad bowl, top with sliced avocado, and drizzle on Primal Kitchen® Dreamy Italian Dressing.

Servings: 4
Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

Learn how to make this recipe.


turkey pineapple burgers

Turkey Pineapple Burgers in Lettuce Wraps

A lighter, slightly tropical take on the classic burger, this pineapple-topped turkey burger is flavored with coconut aminos and chili pepper flakes. It’s reminiscent of a Hawaiian-style burger topped with teriyaki sauce, but Whole30 Chef Sarah Steffens gave the classic recipe a healthy makeover so you get a similar flavor profile without any added sweeteners or soy.

Servings: 4
Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 Applegate Organics® Turkey Burgers*
  • 1 red or yellow onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 4 pineapple rings
  • Sprinkle of chili pepper (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1-2 avocados, peeled and sliced
  • 4 heaping Tbs. Primal Kitchen Classic Mayo (to garnish)
  • 1 head of butter lettuce (torn as individual leaves)
  • Cilantro (to garnish)

Learn how to make this recipe.

*Applegate Organics turkey burgers are Whole30 compliant, but, of course, you can make your own turkey burgers from ground turkey and whatever Whole30 seasonings you like.

chicken avocado salad

Avocado Chicken Salad

Don’t get us wrong—we adore our Primal Kitchen Mayo made with avocado oil—but, sometimes it’s nice to switch things up with a chicken salad recipe that gets its healthy fat and flavor from mashed avocado. Our friend Dani Spies at Clean & Delicious whipped up this easy eight-ingredient chicken salad that can be piled onto butter lettuce leaves, packed with zucchini or carrot chips for a workweek lunch, or served in cucumber boats (spoon out the seeds to make room for the chicken salad).

Servings: 2
Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 heaping cup cooked chicken breast, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 1/4 cup diced celery
  • 1/4 cup sliced scallions
  • 1/2 diced jalapeno (remove ribs and seeds)
  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • 2 tbsp. chopped cilantro
  • 1-2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Learn how to make the recipe.

spinach deviled eggs

Spinach Deviled Eggs

If you love (and miss!) spinach-artichoke dip but want a keto-friendly, Whole30-approved option, these deviled eggs provide an out-of-the-box option that can be enjoyed without remorse. There’s no cheese in sight in this recipe, but it still has all of the creamy, rich flavor of the original dip. The egg whites provide an easy-to-hold package for delivering the flavorful filling, making this recipe perfect for a lunch to go. Pair with a simple green salad, some carrot and celery sticks, and a handful of olives or raw almonds for a tasty moveable feast.

Servings: 2
Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

Learn how to make the recipe.

Whole30 Dinner Recipes

Sheet Pan Steak Fajitas

The whole point of sheet pan meals is to make life easier by delivering a flavorful, balanced meal to your table with very little cooking and cleanup involved. These sheet pan steak fajitas deliver on all counts. Strips of steak, bell pepper and onions served with avocado and salsa is a delicious mix of protein, colorful vegetables and healthy fat. Everything cooks together at the same time.

Servings: 4
Time: 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound flank steak, cut into ½-inch slices*
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/3 cup avocado oil
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 bell peppers, thinly sliced
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced

Learn how to make this recipe.

Salmon Steak Salad with Lemon Turmeric Vinaigrette

This recipe keeps it simple, without sacrificing flavor. Broiled salmon steaks are served over seared tomatoes and peppery arugula for a warm main course salad. The salad is dressed with invigorating Primal Kitchen Lemon-Turmeric Vinaigrette, adding bright citrus flavor and turmeric’s revitalizing health benefits.

Servings: 4
Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

Learn how to make this recipe.

Moroccan Chicken

Moroccan Chicken

Spice up the kitchen with this delicious Moroccan Chicken infused with anti-inflammatory spices and a rich combination of ginger, cinnamon, paprika, coriander, cumin, and Primal Kitchen Lemon Turmeric Vinaigrette & Marinade. Accompanied by crisp green beans and served over a bed of cauliflower rice, this exotic and well-rounded meal comes together in about an hour.

Servings: 4
Time: 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely diced
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne (optional)
  • 4 bone-in chicken thighs (with skin on)
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1 14.5 ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 1 1/4 cup Primal Kitchen Lemon Turmeric Vinaigrette & Marinade
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro
  • 1 lemon, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups green beans
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped mint

Learn how to make this recipe.

Lemon Shrimp Skewers

Spicy Lemon-Garlic Shrimp Skewers

Shrimp skewers are a classic choice for grilling outdoors or indoors. Made in just 20 minutes, these simple shrimp skewers are gluten-free, paleo-friendly, and Whole30-approved. They make a fresh, citrusy, and slightly spicy topper for salad, cauliflower rice, or a bed of grilled asparagus. Our friends at Paleo Hacks graciously shared this quick-cook idea with us.

Servings: 2-3
Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined, tail on
  • 2 lemons, halved and sliced
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon chili flakes
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt to taste

Learn how to make this recipe.

What Whole30 recipes have been your go-tos? Share your favorites below, and thanks for stopping by today.

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The post Whole30® Recipe Roundup appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Most camp food is terrible or the opposite of Primal. Or both.

It’s either an expensive REI tetrapak full of wheat flour, dehydrated “meat,” and desiccated Crisco, a Dough Boy, or the entirely overrated s’more. I’ll get flak for that last one, but I don’t care. S’mores rarely live up to the hype past age 12.

Just because you’re living out of a tent doesn’t mean you have to settle for terrible, unhealthy, unappetizing food. If anything, you should be eating healthier when you camp. It feels corrosive to defile the sanctity and purity of the wild with processed junk food wrapped in plastic. You generate all this trash. Whole, Primal foods taste even better when you camp; packaged garbage somehow tastes even worse.

I’ll cover backpacking food in a future post, but car camping cookery is my specialty. That’s what I’ll cover today—the kind of weekend trip that allows for a sizable cooler, some extras flourishes, and more than a single cooking pot.  There’s nothing better than turning your campsite into a full-fledged camp kitchen, creating hearty meals whose scents permeate the grounds, arousing jealousy and any nearby wandering bears. There’s something about serving up dark chocolate chili and a nice Malbec while the family next to you nibbles PopTarts, heats up the $12 freeze-dried dinner from REI, and plays their 20th game of “War.”

What are my go-to car camping favorites?

Sometimes I’ll just do the basics: eggs, bacon, a piece of meat or fish, some grilled asparagus.

More often, I’ll turn to my favorites….

The Hobo Pack

The hobo pack harkens back to those ancient days when hobos, tramps, and vagabonds of all sorts would travel the dusty roads and endless railroads of classic America carrying heavy duty aluminum foil pouches of meat, taters, and vegetables.

The hobo pack is versatile and forgiving. Anything works, and almost anything will end up tasting damn good. Create a pouch with two layers of aluminum foil. Fill the pouch with meat and vegetables. Place pouch on coals.

Pot Roast—beef, onion, carrot, garlic, salt, pepper, a little red wine.

Salmon—salmon, lemon, broccoli, butternut squash, salt, avocado oil.

Whatever you do, pair your meats and vegetables well. Fish cooks quickly, so you’ll want to include vegetables that cook quickly, too. Beef chuck takes longer, so you’ll want something heartier, like sweet potatoes.

Buried Winter Squash

My absolute favorite winter squash is the honeynut squash. It looks like a butternut squash, only about 1/3 the size and a deep orange. The taste is phenomenal.

Get a nice bed of coals going. Bury your squash in the coals and hot ash. Cover it on all sides.

When they’re soft and tender all over, pull them out. Brush off most of the soot and slice lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds.

They’re good plain, with a little butter, or even a scoop of chevre (soft goat cheese) and salt.

Shakshuka

First, make the harissa from this recipe. Set aside.

Heat up a dutch oven over the fire. Add olive oil, a few chopped garlic cloves, one chopped hot pepper, one chopped sweet pepper, and a tablespoon of ground cumin. Sub cayenne and sweet paprika if you don’t have fresh peppers. Cook until fragrant.

Add the harissa along with a can of crushed tomatoes (or the equivalent in fresh tomatoes, if you have access) and two teaspoons of tomato paste.

Reduce until thickened, salting to taste. When it tastes just right, make a few indentations in the sauce and crack an egg in each. I aim for at least 6 or 7 eggs.

Cover and cook until eggs are cooked to your desired doneness. I like the yolks runny. Serve with a dollop of Greek yogurt, creme fraiche, sour cream, or labneh.

Pancakes with Camp Preserves

For the pancakes, I’ll either do these almond pancakes or these blueberry pancakes. One time, I even mixed some masa harina (lime-treated corn flour, the same stuff used in traditional tortillas) with an egg and a little coconut milk; turned out great. Any Primal pancake recipe you like will work.

For the camp preserves, just chop up whatever fruit you have. I’ve done mangoes, bananas, pears, and strawberries. I’ve done apples and pineapple with cinnamon. I’ve done blueberries, raspberries, blackberries. Every combination I’ve ever tried has worked. I just heat up a pan over the fire, add a little butter (seriously, not much), and throw in the chopped up fruit. Cook until soft, add a little water, mash, and reduce until you have thick camp preserves. Spoon over the pancakes.

Camp Chili

Every time I camp, I make a pot of this chili. I won’t expand on the recipe; you can just read the link. But there are a few ways to streamline the process.

Chop all the peppers and onions and garlic before hand.

Mix all the spices together so you can just keep them in one container and add them in one fell swoop.

Oh, and in the last 10-15 minutes of cooking, drop in a bar of 85% or higher dark chocolate. The one that seems to work the best for me is Valrhona Le Noir 85%. If you can’t find it, any high-cacao content bar will work.

You can also transform the entire character of the dish by adding a tablespoon of cardamom pods with the other spices. That alone makes it almost curry-like. If you go this route, you can also get away with doing lamb instead of beef. Just be sure to strain out the cardamom pods before serving.

Lemon Onion Wings

The day before your trip, blend one large or two medium onions with the juice from 5 lemons and a couple tablespoons of fish sauce in a well-sealed baggy or tupperware container. This is your marinade.

The morning of, place 4-5 pounds of chicken wings in a reliable Ziploc bag and pour the marinade over. You’ll want this to marinate for at least a day, so having this for dinner that night works perfectly.

When you’re ready to cook, place a grill over the campfire. Lay out the wings on paper towels and wipe off most of the marinade. Some bits of lemony onion will remain. That’s fine.

Salt and pepper the wings all over. Place on grill.

Assuming you’ve allowed enough time for the marinade to penetrate, grilling these wings over open flame/hot coals caramelizes the onion-imbued skin. Turn frequently. You want char, but not burning. When you suspect they’re ready, remove the largest wing and cut it open. If it’s done and no pink remains, take the rest off.

Primal Chocolate Cake

Take a Japanese sweet potato—the ones with the purple skin and white flesh. Bury it in some coals and hot ash. If you like the charred flavor and prefer extra caramelization, throw it directly into the coals. If you like a more steamed tuber and wish to avoid charring, wrap it in foil.

Remove from coals after 30 minutes and give it a squeeze. If it’s soft, it’s done. If there are any hard spots, throw it back in for another 5-10 minutes.

Once it’s done, split it down the middle. Insert several squares of good dark chocolate. Sprinkle sea salt. Mash, eat. Primal chocolate cake.

This is by no means an exhaustive list of car camping food, but it’s a solid list of dishes I’ve found to be both doable/realistic and delicious. You’ll notice that the carb counts for many of these dishes are a bit higher than usual. That’s because when I camp, I’m usually very active—hiking, swimming, exploring, playing. You should be, too.

Now I’d love to hear from all the campers out there. What are your favorite Primal foods to cook in the great outdoors?

Thanks for reading, everyone. Take care!

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The post Primal Camping Meals: Weekend “Car Camping” Edition appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering six questions from readers. First, is funding from a biased source sufficient to negate a study’s results? Second, what are some good high intensity interval training workouts that people might not have considered? Third, what can someone recovering from an ACL tear do for HIIT without triggering knee pain flareups? Fourth, how do I like to eat spinach? And finally, how and when do I like to take collagen?

Let’s go:

On the nuts vs. carbs study, I want to say ‘follow the money’ since it was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation. Then again, it was also funded by the Peanut Institute, so I don’t know what to think…

“Following the money” isn’t enough to come to any conclusions about the worth of a study. We can’t declare a study tainted based on bias alone, especially because we can’t avoid bias. Every person reading studies and deciding which one to write about is biased. Every organization meting out funding has biases. Every entity in the known universe has an agenda. It’s not “bad” (or good). It simply is.

If the cow consortium funds the “red meat is actually good for you” study, red meat is still good for you. The bias doesn’t negate the facts. Big Soy funds the “don’t worry about the quarter cup of soybean oil in your restaurant food” study, but it’s only a mark against the paper if the science was shoddy and the conflict of interest exerted influence (which it probably was and did).

But I totally understand where you’re coming from. There’s an entrenched bias against most of the health advice we support. The powers that be have spent decades telling us to avoid the sun, restrict meat (especially red meat), go vegetarian, eat low-fat, get “more complex carbohydrates,” use seed oils, do cardio over weights, eat less salt, and blindly drink more water. They’re not just going to go away—and they aren’t.

So whenever I see a study’s been funded by an obviously biased source, I can’t help but wonder and look more deeply at the paper with a skeptical eye. It sounds like you do the same. That’s great. It’s the kind of healthy skepticism we should all have and employ in our search for good information.

We just can’t stop there.

If the results  of a study are unfavorable to the funders, it’s a strong indication that the funding didn’t interfere with the science.

If the results are favorable to the funders, our hackles rise. We examine the study methods, design, and results to see if bias affected the results. Many times it doesn’t. Sometimes it does.

Can you point us in the direction of a good HIIT workout and what it should look like?

Here are a couple ideas:

Hill sprints. Find a hill and run up, then walk down. Walking down serves as active recovery. Steeper hills, shorter sprints with more rest. Hills with a gradual incline, longer sprints. All permutations work. Though extremely difficult, hill sprints are good options for many people with lower body injuries that flare up on flat ground sprints; running up a hill is gentler on your joints.

Barbell complexes. Pick 3-4 barbell movements. Clean and press for 5 reps. Romanian deadlift for 5 reps. Clean to shoulders, then front squat for 5 reps. Finish with 5 bent over rows. Do that without stopping or dropping the weight. That’s a complex. Drop the bar and rest a minute or two, then do another complex. Repeat. This works with any barbell movement, and you can even do kettlebell or bodyweight complexes. Adjust weight and reps accordingly. These complexes should be hard (but over quickly).

I tore my ACL 6 months ago. Although I am walking 5-7 miles a day and doing heavy lifting for my upper body. I am only able to do ball squats carefully at this point. Any HIIT ideas for me at this point? The bike causes pain on the front of my knee still.

Check with your doctor, but deadlifts are probably safe during knee rehab. Do them right and there’s very little knee flexion (it sounds like flexion hurts the knee); it’s all hip extension.

Deadlifts can become “cardio” if you drop the weight and increase the reps. Just maintain impeccable form. Don’t sacrifice technique (and back health) for a couple extra reps.

If you can deadlift safely for high reps without pain, the next thing to try is the kettlebell swing. Swinging a kettlebell is very similar to deadlifting a barbell—it’s all hip extension—and lends itself well to high-rep, HIIT-style workouts.

I’m one of few people I know who enjoys eating basically any type of offal (no problems with raw), but can’t handle spinach by itself. Any advice? Also, ever tried meditatin’?

And here’s where I’ll get thrown out of my own movement because of one of the ingredients.

Sauté spinach (frozen or fresh) in butter for a minute, add a handful of corn kernels (fresh or frozen, but organic or at least non-GMO), add salt, pepper, and dried chipotle pepper powder (as much as you can tolerate), cover, and turn heat to low. After about ten minutes, it’s ready. Finish with grated sharp cheddar or pecorino romano.

I don’t eat this often (never while keto), and it’s certainly not the only way I enjoy spinach. A good raw spinach salad is fantastic, as is basic sautéd spinach without the corn. But I’ve never met anyone who didn’t like the spinach-corn-chipotle recipe, even avowed spinach haters like yourself.

I’m curious about when Mark was supplementing heavily with collagen. Did he do that at breakfast as his only food, lunch in lieu of some other protein, a shake between lunch and dinner? What have other folks done?

I’m wary of too much protein in one sitting.

I would have 2-3 tablespoons of collagen with a little vitamin C half an hour before a workout. That’s been shown to increase collagen synthesis, a necessary step for healing tendons and other tissues.

That’s it for today, folks. Thanks for reading and take care!

Be sure to add your own comments, questions, and input down below.

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